Font Editor Archives s

Font Editor Archives s

It seems that there is a PowerPC native double-byte TT font editor included in the Hong Kong/Taiwan localized release of the Mac OS (7.6T). I tried making one a while back, but I was just not good enough. 1: Is it ok that we're creating this font? Archive of freely downloadable fonts. Browse by alphabetical listing, by style, by author or by popularity.

Font Editor Archives s - confirm

Fonts

Part I Chapter 6

Written by Zach Leatherman

Reviewed by John Teague and Aymen Loukil

Analyzed by TJ Monserrat and Rick Viscomi

Edited by Barry Pollard

Introduction

Web fonts enable beautiful and functional typography on the web. Using web fonts not only empowers design, but it democratizes a subset of design, as it allows easier access to those who might not have particularly strong design skills. However, for all the good they can do, web fonts can also do great harm to your site’s performance if they are not loaded properly.

Are they a net positive for the web? Do they provide more benefit than harm? Are the web standards cowpaths sufficiently paved to encourage web font loading best practices by default? And if not, what needs to change? Let’s take a data-driven peek at whether or not we can answer those questions by inspecting how web fonts are used on the web today.

Where did you get those web fonts?

The first and most prominent question: performance. There is a whole chapter dedicated to performance but we will delve a little into font-specific performance issues here.

Using hosted web fonts enables ease of implementation and maintenance, but self-hosting offers the best performance. Given that web fonts by default make text invisible while the web font is loading (also known as the Flash of Invisible Text, or FOIT), the performance of web fonts can be more critical than non-blocking assets like images.

Are fonts being hosted on the same host or by a different host?

Differentiating self-hosting against third-party hosting is increasingly relevant in an HTTP/2 world, where the performance gap between a same-host and different-host connection can be wider. Same-host requests have the huge benefit of a better potential for prioritization against other same-host requests in the waterfall.

Recommendations to mitigate the performance costs of loading web fonts from another host include using the , , and resource hints, but high priority web fonts should be same-host requests to minimize the performance impact of web fonts. This is especially important for fonts used by very visually prominent content or body copy occupying the majority of a page.

Popular web font hosting strategies.

Bar chart showing the popularity of third-party and self-hosting strategies for web fonts. 75% of mobile web pages use third-party hosts and 25% self-host. Desktop websites have similar usage.

The fact that three quarters are hosted is perhaps unsurprising given Google Fonts dominance that we will discuss below.

Google serves fonts using third-party CSS files hosted on . Developers add requests to these stylesheets using tags in their markup. While these stylesheets are render blocking, they are very small. However, the font files are hosted on yet another domain, . The model of requiring two separate hops to two different domains makes a great option here for the second request that will not be discovered until the CSS is downloaded.

Note that while would be a nice addition to load the font files higher in the request waterfall (remember that sets up the connection, it doesn’t request the file content), is not yet available with Google Fonts. Google Fonts generates unique URLs for their font files which are subject to change.

What are the most popular third-party hosts?

HostDesktopMobile
fonts.gstatic.com75.4%74.9%
use.typekit.net7.2%6.6%
maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com1.8%2.0%
use.fontawesome.com1.1%1.2%
static.parastorage.com0.8%1.2%
fonts.shopifycdn.com0.6%0.6%
cdn.shopify.com0.5%0.5%
cdnjs.cloudflare.com0.4%0.5%
use.typekit.com0.4%0.4%
netdna.bootstrapcdn.com0.3%0.4%
fast.fonts.net0.3%0.3%
static.dealer.com0.2%0.2%
themes.googleusercontent.com0.2%0.2%
static-v.tawk.to0.1%0.3%
stc.utdstc.com0.1%0.2%
cdn.jsdelivr.net0.2%0.2%
kit-free.fontawesome.com0.2%0.2%
open.scdn.co0.1%0.1%
assets.squarespace.com0.1%0.1%
fonts.jimstatic.com0.1%0.2%

The dominance of Google Fonts here was simultaneously surprising and unsurprising at the same time. It was unsurprising in that I expected the service to be the most popular and surprising in the sheer dominance of its popularity. 75% of font requests is astounding. TypeKit was a distant single-digit second place, with the Bootstrap library accounting for an even more distant third place.

While the high usage of Google Fonts here is very impressive, it is also noteworthy that only 29% of pages included a Google Fonts element. This could mean a few things:

  • When pages uses Google Fonts, they use a lot of Google Fonts. They are provided without monetary cost, after all. Perhaps they’re being used in a popular WYSIWYG editor? This seems like a very likely explanation.
  • Or a more unlikely story is that it could mean that a lot of people are using Google Fonts with instead of .
  • Or if we want to go off the deep end into super unlikely scenarios, it could mean that many people are using Google Fonts with an HTTP header instead.

Google Fonts documentation encourages the for the Google Fonts CSS to be placed as the first child in the of a page. This is a big ask! In practice, this is not common as only half a percent of all pages (about 20,000 pages) took this advice.

More so, if a page is using or as elements, these would come before the Google Fonts CSS anyway. Read on for more about these resource hints.

Speeding up third-party hosting

As mentioned above, a super easy way to speed up web font requests to a third-party host is to use the resource hint.

Wow! Less than 2% of pages are using ! Given that Google Fonts is at 75%, this should be higher! Developers: if you use Google Fonts, use ! Google Fonts: proselytize more!

In fact, if you’re using Google Fonts go ahead and add this to your if it’s not there already:

Most popular typefaces

RankFont familyDesktopMobile
1Open Sans24%22%
2Roboto15%19%
3Montserrat5%4%
4Source Sans Pro4%3%
5Noto Sans JP3%3%
6Lato3%3%
7Nanum Gothic4%2%
8Noto Sans KR3%2%
9Roboto Condensed2%2%
10Raleway2%2%
11FontAwesome1%1%
12Roboto Slab1%1%
13Noto Sans TC1%1%
14Poppins1%1%
15Ubuntu1%1%
16Oswald1%1%
17Merriweather1%1%
18PT Sans1%1%
19Playfair Display1%1%
20Noto Sans1%1%

It is unsurprising that the top entries here seem to match up very similarly to Google Fonts’ list of fonts sorted by popularity.

What font formats are being used?

WOFF2 is pretty well supported in web browsers today. Google Fonts serves WOFF2, a format that offers improved compression over its predecessor WOFF, which was itself already an improvement over other existing font formats.

Popularity of web font MIME types.

Bar chart showing the popularity of web font MIME types. WOFF2 is used on 74% of fonts, followed by 13% WOFF, 6% octet-stream, 3% TTF, 2% plain, 1% HTML, 1% SFNT, and fewer than 1% for all other types. Desktop and mobile have similar distributions.

From my perspective, an argument could be made to go WOFF2-only for web fonts after seeing the results here. I wonder where the double-digit WOFF usage is coming from? Perhaps developers still serving web fonts to Internet Explorer?

Third place (and a little further down) would seem to suggest that a lot of web servers are configured improperly, sending an incorrect MIME type with web font file requests.

Let’s dig a bit deeper and look at the values used in the property of declarations:

Popularity of font formats in @font-face declarations.

Bar chart showing the popularity of formats used in font-face declarations. 69% of desktop pages’ @font-face declarations specify the WOFF2 format, 11% WOFF, 10% TrueType, 8% SVG, 2% EOT, and fewer than 1% OpenType, TTF, and OTF. The distribution for mobile pages is similar.

I was hoping to see SVG fonts on the decline. They’re buggy and implementations have been removed from every browser except Safari. Time to drop these, y’all.

The SVG data point here also makes me wonder what MIME type y’all are serving these SVG fonts with. I don’t see anywhere in Figure 6.7. Anyway, don’t worry about fixing that, just get rid of them!

WOFF2-only

RankFormat combinationsDesktopMobile
1woff284.0%81.9%
2svg, truetype, woff4.3%4.0%
3svg, truetype, woff, woff23.5%3.2%
4eot, svg, truetype, woff1.3%2.9%
5woff, woff21.8%1.8%
6eot, svg, truetype, woff, woff21.2%2.1%
7truetype, woff0.9%1.1%
8woff0.7%0.8%
9truetype0.6%0.7%
10truetype, woff, woff20.6%0.6%
11opentype, woff, woff20.3%0.2%
12svg0.2%0.2%
13eot, truetype, woff0.1%0.2%
14opentype, woff0.1%0.1%
15opentype0.1%0.1%
16eot0.1%0.1%
17opentype, svg, truetype, woff0.1%0.0%
18opentype, truetype, woff, woff20.0%0.0%
19eot, truetype, woff, woff20.0%0.0%
20svg, woff0.0%0.0%

This dataset seems to suggest that the majority of people are already using WOFF2-only in their blocks. But this is misleading of course, per our earlier discussion on the dominance of Google Fonts in the data set. Google Fonts does some sniffing methods to serve a streamlined CSS file and only includes the most modern . Unsurprisingly, WOFF2 dominates the results here for that reason, as browser support for WOFF2 has been pretty broad for some time now.

Importantly, this particular data doesn’t really support or detract from the case to go WOFF2-only yet, but it remains a tempting idea.

Fighting against invisible text

The number one tool we have to fight the default web font loading behavior of “invisible while loading” (also known as FOIT), is . Adding to your block is an easy way to tell the browser to show fallback text while the web font is loading.

Browser support is great too. Internet Explorer and pre-Chromium Edge don’t have support but they also render fallback text by default when a web font loads (no FOITs allowed here). For our Chrome tests, how commonly is used?

I assume this will be creeping up over time, especially now that Google Fonts is adding to all new code snippets copied from their site.

If you’re using Google Fonts, update your snippets! If you’re not using Google Fonts, use ! Read more about on MDN.

Let’s have a look at what values are popular:

Usage of font-display values.

Bar chart showing the usage of the font-display style. 2.6% of mobile pages set this style to , 1.5% to , 0.7% to , 0.4% to , 0.2% to optional, and 0.1% to enclosed in quotes, which is invalid. The desktop distribution is similar except usage is lower by 0.4 percentage points and usage is higher by 0.1 percentage points.

As an easy way to show fallback text while a web font is loading, reigns supreme and is the most common value. is also the default value used by new Google Fonts code snippets too. I would have expected (only render if cached) to have a bit more usage here as a few prominent developer evangelists lobbied for it a bit, but no dice.

How many web fonts are too many?

This is a question that requires some measure of nuance. How are the fonts being used? For how much content on the page? Where does this content live in the layout? How are the fonts being rendered? In lieu of nuance however let’s dive right into some broad and heavy handed analysis specifically centered on request counts.

Distribution of font requests per page.

Bar chart showing the distribution of font requests per page. The 10, 25, 50, 75, and 90th percentiles for desktop are: 0, 1, 3, 6, and 9 font requests. The distribution for mobile is identical until the 75th and 90th percentiles, where mobile pages request 1 fewer font.

The median web page makes three web font requests. At the 90th percentile, requested six and nine web fonts on mobile and desktop, respectively.

Histogram of web fonts requested per page.

Histogram showing the distribution of the number of font requests per page. The most popular number of font requests is 0 at 22% of desktop pages. The distribution drops to 9% of pages having 1 font, then crests at 10% for 2-4 fonts before falling as the number of fonts increases. The desktop and mobile distributions are similar, although the mobile distribution skews slightly toward having fewer fonts per page.

It does seem quite interesting that web font requests seem to be pretty steady across desktop and mobile. I’m glad to see the recommendation to hide blocks inside of a queries didn’t catch on (don’t get any ideas).

That said there are marginally more requests for fonts made on mobile devices. My hunch here is that fewer typefaces are available on mobile devices, which in turn means fewer hits in Google Fonts CSS, falling back to network requests for these.

You don’t want to win this award

The award for the page that requests the most web fonts goes to a site that made 718 web font requests!

After diving into the code, all of those 718 requests are going to Google Fonts! It looks like a malfunctioning “Above the Page fold” optimization plugin for WordPress has gone rogue on this site and is requesting (DDoS-ing?) all the Google Fonts—oops!

Ironic that a performance optimization plugin can make your performance much worse!

More accurate matching with

is a great CSS property to let the browser know specifically which code points the page would like to use in the font file. If the declaration has a , content on the page must match one of the code points in the range before the font is requested. It is a very good thing.

This is another metric that I expect was skewed by Google Fonts usage, as Google Fonts uses in most (if not all) of its CSS. I’d expect this to be less common in user land, but perhaps filtering out Google Fonts requests in the next edition of the Almanac may be possible.

Don’t request web fonts if a system font exists

is a nice way to reference a system font in your . If the font exists, it doesn’t need to make a request for a web font at all. This is used both extensively and controversially by Google Fonts, so it is likely another example of skewed data if we’re trying to glean patterns from user land.

It should also be noted here that it has been said by smarter people than I (Bram Stein of TypeKit) that using can be unpredictable as installed versions of fonts can be outdated and unreliable.

Condensed fonts and

Historically, has suffered from poor browser support and was not a well-known property. Read more about on MDN. But browser support has broadened.

It has been suggested that using condensed fonts on smaller viewports allows more text to be viewable, but this approach isn’t commonly used. That being said, that this property is used half a percentage point more on desktop than mobile is unexpected, and 7% seems much higher than I would have predicted.

Variable fonts are the future

Variable fonts allow several font weights and styles to be included in the one font file.

Even at 1.8% this was higher than expected, although I am excited to see this take off. Google Fonts v2 does include some support for variable fonts.

Usage of font-variation-settings axes.

Bar chart showing the usage of the font-variation-settings property. 42% of properties on desktop pages are set to the value, 32% to , 16% to , 2% or fewer to , , , , and more. The most notable differences between desktop and mobile pages are 26% usage of , 38% of , and 23% of .

Through the lens of this large data set, these are very low sample sizes-take these results with a grain of salt. However, as the most common axis on desktop pages is notable, with and trailing. In my experience, the introductory demos for variable fonts are usually weight-based.

Color fonts might also be the future?

Usage here of these is basically nonexistent but you can check out the excellent resource Color Fonts! WTF? for more information. Similar (but not at all) to the SVG format for fonts (which is bad and going away), this allows you to embed SVG inside of OpenType files, which is awesome and cool.

Conclusion

The biggest takeaway here is that Google Fonts dominates the web font discussion. Approaches they’ve taken weigh heavily on the data we’ve recorded here. The positives here are easy access to web fonts, good font formats (WOFF2), and for-free configurations. The downsides here are performance drawbacks associated with third-party hosting, different-host requests, and no access to .

I fully expect that in the future we’ll see the “Rise of the Variable Font”. This should be paired with a decline in web font requests, as Variable Fonts combine multiple individual font files into a single composite font file. But history has shown us that what usually happens here is that we optimize a thing and then add more things to fill the vacancy.

It will be very interesting to see if color fonts increase in popularity. I expect these to be far more niche than variable fonts but may see a lifeline in the icon font space.

Keep those fonts frosty, y’all.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

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fontforge-announce — Used by me to announce changes to fontforge

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[image: org.fontforge.FontForge.png] Hi, all. On Wednesday, November 7th, 2000, George W. Williams V first published a piece of software called PfaEdit that allowed rudimentary editing of PostScript fonts. It lacked the features and polish of such prominent products as Fontographer and Font Studio, but it had one big advantage: it was free. Twenty years later, Fontographer and FontStudio are gone, and the whereabouts of George Williams are unknown, but FontForge has grown into a highly capable and mature product. It supports dozens of file formats and includes such features as spline stroking, overlap removal, and Python scripting. And it is still free software. With over 100,000 users, it is the most widely used typeface design tool in the world. It may seem anti-climactic that today's 20th anniversary release includes no major changes or new features, but it perfectly befits a product that has evolved carefully and slowly over its entire lifecycle with almost no breaking changes. Whether for the special commemorative splash screen or for the countless small improvements and fixes, we hope that you will try it. It is available, as always, on the FontForge website <https://fontforge.org/>. The entire project team thank you for your support. Best wishes, Frank
[image: org.fontforge.FontForge.png] Hi, all. I am happy to announce the March 2020 release of FontForge. Changes include the following. - FontForge now has much improved stroke expansion functionality. The main change is that it actually works most of the time. New features include support for arbitrary convex nibs and the miter-clip and arc join styles from SVG 2. All functionality is accessible from the Python and native APIs. (By Skef Iterum.) - Remove overlap handles certain important edge cases better. (By Skef Iterum and Frank Trampe.) - The Python API now has a function called `genericGlyphChange` that matches the "Change Glyph" command in the GUI. See #4133 for more details. (By Skef Iterum.) - The Python API now has functions for getting Unicode script and for interrogating glyph boundaries. (By Fred Brennan.) - One can now use text flags (rather than just numerical flags) when opening a font file via the Python API. (By Skef Iterum.) - UFO import now outputs the note field properly. (By Skef Iterum.) - SVG import is much more robust. (By Skef Iterum.) - We have dropped most gnulib and autotools logic in favor of CMake, which dramatically simplifies the build system and just as dramatically improves build time. (By Jeremy Tan.) - As part of the switch to CMake, per the deprecation of Python 2, and per the lack of objections to the proposal on the mailing list, we have dropped support for building FontForge with Python 2 support. The non-build-system Python 2 code remains, but it is neither tested nor maintained nor supported and is likely to follow a trajectory of decay and then removal. - Documentation is now rendered in Sphinx, which makes maintenance and improvement easier. (By Jeremy Tan.) - Translations now happen on crowdin, which makes contributions easier. (By Jeremy Tan.) - We got such a contribution for Croatian. (By Milo Ivir.) - Character view point coloring is more consistent, and preview fills support transparency. (By Skef Iterum.) - The user can now move and close tabs in the character view. (By Fred Brennan.) - The metrics view now allows for entry of negative kerning values and runs a bit more smoothly. (By Fred Brennan.) - There is now a warning when a user is about to discard an unsaved script. (By Fred Brennan.) - We fixed bugs all over, as always, with particular attention given to the metrics view, Python, Spiro, and high-resolution displays. Go to the FontForge website <https://fontforge.org/> to get the right package for your system. Best wishes, Frank
Yes. The build process broke in the midst of other changes. They will be ready with the next release. Please try the AppImage if that works. On Mon, Apr 15, 2019 at 10:11 AM Mauro Sacchetto <[email protected]> wrote: > .deb packages are not yet ready? > thanx > > ms > > Il 13/04/19 12:45, T J ha scritto: > > Hi all, > > > > FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. > > > > This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Most > > notably, it resolves a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that > > contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has > > also been removed. > > > > The source tarball, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) and Windows binaries are all > > available from https://fontforge.github.io. > > > > Thanks, > > > > Jeremy > > > > > > > > _______________________________________________ > > Fontforge-announce mailing list > > [email protected] > > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce > > > > > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
I did not issue notes for the previous release since a new one was imminent anyway. I am attaching them here. - The user interface is now able to use GDK instead of X11, which means much smoother operation on Windows and Macintosh. - UFO 2 and UFO 3 are now handled as separate formats, which allows us to support more of the UFO 3 format. Some workflows may need adjustment as a result. See this bulletin <http://fontforge.github.io/en-US/bulletins/ufo3_2018_1/> for more information. - FontForge now tolerates a much wider range of syntax in feature files. - FontForge can now import and export WOFF2. - FontForge now supports Unicode 12.1.0. - The Python interface now allows finer interaction with splines. On Sun, Apr 14, 2019 at 3:43 AM T J <[email protected]> wrote: > Hi all, > > > > FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. > > > > This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Most > notably, it resolves a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that > contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has > also been removed. > > > > The source tarball, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) and Windows binaries are all > available from https://fontforge.github.io. > > > > Thanks, > > Jeremy > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
.deb packages are not yet ready? thanx ms Il 13/04/19 12:45, T J ha scritto: > Hi all, > > FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. > > This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Most > notably, it resolves a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that > contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has > also been removed. > > The source tarball, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) and Windows binaries are all > available from https://fontforge.github.io. > > Thanks, > > Jeremy > > > > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
Hi all, FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Most notably, it resolves a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has also been removed. The source tarball, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) and Windows binaries are all available from https://fontforge.github.io. Thanks, Jeremy
Hello, my characters are already drawn with Illustrator, which is my favorite vector program. Unfortunately copy + paste from Illu to Fontforge doesn’t work (on my Mac). Is there any solution? Thanks in advance! Friendly Greetz Peter Hübner Homepage: http://PH-Layout.de E-Mail: [email protected]
Hi, Judith. The announcement list is only for release announcements, so incoming mail only goes to the list administrators rather than to the user community. If you want community support, I would suggest joining the users list <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-users>. I also don't understand your question, but I'll inquire further when you post there. Best wishes, Frank On Thu, Oct 20, 2016 at 11:19 PM, Dr. Judith Martha Prewitt < [email protected]> wrote: > Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook > on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in > LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? > > Judith Prewitt > > > ------------------------------------------------------------ > ------------------ > Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most > engaging tech sites, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
Hi Judith, Here's something similar: http://superuser.com/questions/490922/merging-two-fonts Mike On 21 October 2016 at 16:16, Mike Wallbridge <[email protected]> wrote: > Hi Judith, > > For some reason I don't understand, your question about merging fonts came > into my inbox. I'm not a techy so don't know exactly what you mean but I > may have done something similar of late in editing a font to use certain > symbols I wanted to bring in for the purpose of music annotations. It was a > case of feeling my way along but ended up being much easier than I thought. > Anyway I used a free Mac app called FontForge and it was very intuitive, > though you do need to install XQuartz first. If you open a ttf font into > Font Forge you get basically a map of the keys and the symbols within and > can edit them by using copy and paste. So by opening up two fonts you can > shift symbols around to get what you're after. Very straightforward. The > file you end up with doesn't have the ttf suffix (I can't remember what it > is) but you can easily go on-line and find a converter. Rename the "new" > font and put it in the font folder. It should work with both Pages and > LibreOffice. I hope this helps. > > Cheers > Mike > > On 21 October 2016 at 05:19, Dr. Judith Martha Prewitt < > [email protected]> wrote: > >> Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook >> on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in >> LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? >> >> Judith Prewitt >> >> >> ------------------------------------------------------------ >> ------------------ >> Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most >> engaging tech sites, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot >> _______________________________________________ >> Fontforge-announce mailing list >> [email protected] >> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >> > >
Hi Judith, For some reason I don't understand, your question about merging fonts came into my inbox. I'm not a techy so don't know exactly what you mean but I may have done something similar of late in editing a font to use certain symbols I wanted to bring in for the purpose of music annotations. It was a case of feeling my way along but ended up being much easier than I thought. Anyway I used a free Mac app called FontForge and it was very intuitive, though you do need to install XQuartz first. If you open a ttf font into Font Forge you get basically a map of the keys and the symbols within and can edit them by using copy and paste. So by opening up two fonts you can shift symbols around to get what you're after. Very straightforward. The file you end up with doesn't have the ttf suffix (I can't remember what it is) but you can easily go on-line and find a converter. Rename the "new" font and put it in the font folder. It should work with both Pages and LibreOffice. I hope this helps. Cheers Mike On 21 October 2016 at 05:19, Dr. Judith Martha Prewitt < [email protected]> wrote: > Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook > on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in > LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? > > Judith Prewitt > > > ------------------------------------------------------------ > ------------------ > Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most > engaging tech sites, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? Judith Prewitt
Can the new version be compiled to run on earlier versions of Mac OSX than 10.10? On Tue, Oct 4, 2016 at 7:09 AM, Frank Trampe <[email protected]> wrote: > [image: Inline image 1] > Hi, folks. > > I'm happy to announce the October release of FontForge, a little late > perhaps, but worth the wait. It brings a number of changes. > > - The modern-looking theme featured on the website, created by Andreas > Larsen, now ships by default with FontForge. All old themes continue to > work. > - Handling of CID ranges, certain bitmap typeface formats, and spline > stroking is better and more consistent. > - FontForge now supports Unicode 9.0. > - We (and I mean mostly Jeremy Tan) fixed a number of user interface > quirks. > - And we fixed some crashes. > > > Go to the FontForge website <http://fontforge.github.io/en-US/> to get > the right package for your platform. > > Best wishes, > > Frank > > > ------------------------------------------------------------ > ------------------ > Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most > engaging tech sites, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce > > -- -- Jason Pagura zimbach at gmail dot com
[image: Inline image 1] Hi, folks. I'm happy to announce the October release of FontForge, a little late perhaps, but worth the wait. It brings a number of changes. - The modern-looking theme featured on the website, created by Andreas Larsen, now ships by default with FontForge. All old themes continue to work. - Handling of CID ranges, certain bitmap typeface formats, and spline stroking is better and more consistent. - FontForge now supports Unicode 9.0. - We (and I mean mostly Jeremy Tan) fixed a number of user interface quirks. - And we fixed some crashes. Go to the FontForge website <http://fontforge.github.io/en-US/> to get the right package for your platform. Best wishes, Frank
----- Khaled Hosny <[email protected]> wrote: > On Mon, Feb 21, 2011 at 07:25:31PM -0800, George Williams wrote: > > I've packaged up a new release of fontforge. > > Great! Not so great. I left out two patches. There's a new, new release now please use it instead.
I've packaged up a new release of fontforge.
I fear I no longer have time to provide (and support) binary releases, so the current release is source (and documentation) only.
I have, I hope, posted a new release of fontforge. Sourceforge has changed it's release upload mechanism. It no longer seems possible to have sourceforge send out automatic emails announcing this fact. More troubling, sourceforge claims there is a 15 minute delay between my posting files and them being available for release. It has been several hours, and at the moment only three of the files I posted are displayed. Perhaps it takes longer than 15 minutes. Perhaps something more is broken.
[email protected] skribis: > The first time you run fontforge with Pango something takes several > minutes to initialize itself. This delay does not occur on > subsequent invocations. Building a font cache, perhaps, especially if it isn't depending on fontconfig for all the font info and so has to open all the fonts for itself. One has to wait similarly while LuaTeX uses fontforge code to build a font cache. :)
First release with Pango and Cairo. The first time you run fontforge with Pango something takes several minutes to initialize itself. This delay does not occur on subsequent invocations. The version of Cairo available from fink on the mac is so old that FontForge can't use it. The default fontconfig setup on the mac does not seem to find any outline fonts (reverting to bitmaps). Create a ~/.fonts directory yourself, and put some fonts there. Pango crashes on my cygwin system, so the cygwin build does not contain either Pango or Cairo.
Support for Adobe's proposed cmap format=14 subtable (variation selectors) Support for making fontforge a python extension.
31-August-2007 * New traditional Chinese translation of the UI by Wei-Lun Chao. * Updated Vietnamese translation by Clytie Siddall. * Removed the old MetaFont command (which didn't work) and replaced it with a styles menu (incorporating the old Effects menu, and a command to change weight, to condense/extend, and to oblique. Added python scripting commands {font,glyph}.{changeWeight,condenseExtend} * Lots of new work on the truetype autoinstructor by Alexej and Michal. * Add a validation dialog which can be run just before generating a font. * Try a different algorithm for approximating splines by line segments (for drawing them in the outline glyph view and elsewhere). This one should show symmetry better. * Provide the ability to ask freetype to rasterize glyphs without hints in the Print/Display dlg (even if the glyphs have hints, rasterize them without). * Oh dear, rasterizing stroked fonts only worked if multilayer was defined. * Try to improve display of stroked fonts. * When stroking splines don't let miter joins grow excessively. * FF would remove instructions from glyphs that had at least two contours the first of which started with a control point. * Add a short cut for Hide Grid in the metrics view. * Python 2.5 initializes itself differently from Python 2.[34]. 2.[34] delay the init until an import happens, while 2.5 does it at start up. I just assumed that when I called Py_Initialize that it did so. This led to a crash on 2.[34] when I tried to use my types before the user had tried to import fontforge. * Further improvements to tile path. * When moving a control point in a ttf font where one side of the cp was a real point, I would allow an implicit point on the far side of the real point to become real. * When dragging truetype points around, adjacent implicit points would remain where they were (and not be implicit any longer). * FF would randomly crash after removing a lot of glyphs. * The knife tool would not cut a contour if it landed on a point. * Trying to add a stylename to the size pane of fontinfo generally caused a crash. * All blank lines in the display dlg had the same line spacing as that of the first character displayed in the dlg. * I don't think feature files where handling classes defined with '-' properly. * Read the "lib" structures from UFO/GLIF files into our python persistant data. (And write our persistant data out if it's a dict). * Add the ability to call hooks (python functions) when various fontforge events take place. * Make fontforge's basic types (Point, Contour, and Layer) be picklable so they can now be saved in an sfd file. * Oops. With the inclusion of the library check argument, ff would not compile if NODYNAMIC were set. * FontForge now stores the "userdata" python members into the sfd file as pickled objects. (FontForge's own types are not currently pickleable). * Add the ability to mark a glyph so that just before being saved its references will be unlinked and we will run remove overlap on it. This means the user can work with the references (and get the automatic updating they confer) and still not have a self-intersecting glyph in the output (think Aring, Ccedilla, Eogonek). * Create a fontlint script file. * When dumping both apple and opentype bitmap tables if there were a BDF table, then we'd get garbage for 'bloc'/'bhed'. * Add some user interface commands to python, and more importantly, add the ability to create menu items which will invoke python scripts, and the ability to add import/export conversion filters (again, python scripts). * Counter hints for LCG glyphs came out wrong if autohint had not been applied first. * Counter masks were not read out of sfd files properly. * Selecting a counter mask in Glyph Info caused FF to crash. * The Execute Script dlg would sometimes complain about invalid scrollbar size when it got closed. * AddAnchorPoint (scripting command) should be prepared to cast real args to integers. * Just as I needed a special "in use" pass of GSUB when reading from a TTC, so I also need an "in use" pass of the MATH table. * All this time and I've mapped "nonmarkingreturn" (GID=2) to Unicode+000C instead of Unicode+000D. I'm a twit.
23-July-2007 * I have merged (and substantially rewritten) the Print and Display Dialogs. There is now only one menu item (Print) which (vaguely) the old Display dlg except that it can now be printed. The text area widget now supports OpenType features just as the metrics view does. It also supports ligature carets. The dialog is no longer modal, however it does not get updated with each change to the font (that would make moving a point around in the outline view far too sluggish), instead there is a [Refresh] button the user can press to force an update. * It occurred to me that fontforge's current mechanism for setting ligature carets requires that there be a ligature substitution is the exact number of components used to make the glyph. But in indic fonts ligatures are often made up out of other ligatures (I think) which means that there won't be enough caret positions. So I've added a Ligature Caret count to the Element->Glyph Info dialog to give the user control over it when necessary. * Add minimal support for applying apple state machine lookups in metrics view. Support is minimal because: * Apple seems to figure line breaks before doing substitution process but I do it afterward so I don't know where the line breaks are and I can't enter either the line start or line end state. * When I delete a glyph I delete it. Apple inserts a deleted glyph mark and then removes that later. State machines can respond to deleted glyphs, but I can't. * I don't try to figure out which feature,settings should be on by default. So the user must pick them out manually. * Add popup graphics to the Glyph Info and Lookup subtable dialogs to show substitutions (that is if there is an entry like 'smcp' a => a.sc then create a popup window showing the "a" glyph and the "a.sc" so the user can see what happens. * Another futile attempt at an embolden command. Element->Embolden * Add shortcuts to the anchor control dlg (Page Up/Page Down) to move to the next/previous glyph. * Michal Nowakowski has improved the truetype autoinstructor. He warns that it probably still has bugs (as what does not?) so I am leaving the old code available for now. He says it works best in "a clean (uninstructed) font with well defined blue zones and stems". * If we have a glyph with multiple encodings, and the secondary encodings occur after the primary ones, then the backmap will probably contain a secondary encoding, which means that when we go to load the font in we will probably notice the secondary encoding twice and forget the primary. * I used not to distinguish between ligature anchors and normal mark to base anchors. Unfortunately when I moved to lookups (from features) I had to introduce that distinction. But I didn't work through all the implications and have fixed a number of bugs related to that. * Barry SCHWARTZ complains that font info says "fontnames must" but that the cited adobe tech note only says "should". So change "must" to "should". * When processing class-based contextual lookups fontforge could not handle class 0 (the class containing "all glyphs not in another class") add code to do that. * If the user did not select a Gasp Version (note: active selection was needed, just seeing that it was correct and leaving it didn't work) then [OK] would leave the font with an invalid version and on some systems caused a crash. * View->Insert Glyph After didn't work well on a ligature glyph. It would insert the glyph after the first component of the ligature, not after the last -- which would make more sense. * Misnamed some private dict entries when loading from otf. * Make entry of ghost hints better. * Add the ability to determine whether a point is selected or not from python. * Add a mechanism so the user can ask fontforge to check for the existance of optional libraries. * Add range checks to some library routines which blindly referenced some BMP arrays with codepoints outside bmp. Broken by UCS2->UCS4 change. * Werner wants GotoChar to be able to switch sub-fonts in a cid keyed font. This may introduce bugs... * Revert glyph still wasn't working. * Someone complained that using a negative stroke took a very long time but produced correct results. Um. Ok. It's easy always to use the absolute value. * Oops. The mac uses UCS2 for filenames, so when I moved to UCS4 I should have changed the mac resource file interface. * When creating a mac resource file we only set the type/creator fields and failed to initialize the finderFlags. * Fixed crash bug in generating a cursive connection anchor sub-table. * In TrueType composite glyphs with the USE_MY_METRICS bit set the lock icon wasn't scrolled properly. * The change from UCS2 to UCS4 broke text copy/paste. We failed to add a terminating NUL of the right size in all cases We continued to use charset=UCS-2 when it should have been UCS-4 * FF crashed when trying to View->Show ATT on a font that appears to me to contain an invalid 'kern' sub-table. I have removed the proximate cause of the crash. I have provided a warning that the kern table appears invalid. And I have cleaned up my internals after detecting the bad sub-table (I had a lookup with a feature but no script and this caused problems). * Multiple substitutions in the metrics view did not properly update the count of glyphs to be displayed. * If nothing changed in the metrics input field and the output contained a ligature (or a mult subs I suspect). FF would complain. * in python, font.generate() didn't work. The PyArg_ParseTupleAndKeywords behaves in a way I did not expect. * [Bottom] and [Down] still didn't work for lookup subtables. * Try to force the text field in the metricsview to a fixed size. In some fonts it seems to be initialized to a huge value. * Add ability to display italic side bearings in the char view. * The lines drawn for italic fonts to show the italic origin and width were at slightly the wrong angle (I used a sine when I should have used a tangent). * If a font did not have any horizontal metrics then ff would not set the em-size. * Show Att trampled on memory when displaying apple contextual substitution state machines. * Wasn't parsing apple's 'lcar' table properly. * if a font contained a 'post' table but didn't name all names (or something like that), then the attempt to name the glyph based on the encoding was broken after the encoding change. * FF did not recognize that a bdf file was greymaped. Broken by the bdf properties work a year ago or so. * The import lookups button in fontinfo forgot about the subtables (sort of). * The metricsview used the wrong count field to determine whether things changed. It used the glyph count, not the char count (which meant that when we had a ligature and the number of chars was greater than the number of glyphs, things got confused.) * In the metrics view, anchored attachments only worked if the base glyph were itself unmoved (that is the mark was placed relative to the unmoved location, not the actual location). * The search dialog should provide user with control over the error bound. The rotate checkbox didn't work if the flip checkbox wasn't checked. * If a replace contour added a control point to a point that did not have one (went from a line to a curve) then that control point would get lost. If a search matched across the start point of a contour then search/replace could go into an infinite loop if the search and replace paths were the same. * Find/Replace (replace) didn't work on quadratic splines. * Add two python methods: * Layer.interpolateNewLayer(other-layer,amount) * Font.createInterpolatedGlyph(glyph1,glyph2,amount) The first creates a new layer by interpolating between the current layer and the layer in the first argument. The second creates a new glyph in the font by interpolating between the first two arguments. The glyph's unicodecode point and name will be copied from the first argument (the font must not already contain this glyph). If amount is 0 the result will look like the first glyph, if 1 then like the second. * When recovering from a crash, FF would sometimes complain about a mismatched version number. Don't. * Problems parsing 'mort' tables could cause a crash. * When building a contextual lookup, don't list that lookup as something that it could invoke (ie. list all lookups in this table (GPOS/GSUB) except for ourselves). Don't want to encourage users to create infinite lookup loops. * Point matching didn't work when there were references to references and multiple references within a glyph. * FF was having problems with extension lookups with multiple sub tables. * We were trying to print a trailing NUL in some strings from the fontview. * Kerning by classes got broken in metricsview by the addition of support for device tables. * A GPOS contextual lookup only listed GSUB lookups in the lookup/sequence dlg Pressing [OK] in the lookup/sequence dlg caused a crash if no lookup selected. * Openfontdlg was looking at the filter listbutton rather than the rename namelist listbutton. * mf2pt1 now uses "glyph_dimensions" rather than "bbox" * The metrics view should now handle device tables. * Goto could crash when used on small encodings. * -lang wasn't permitted before -c. * Use numeric text fields for anchor positioning. * Graham Asher points out that the meanings of underline position in the 'post' table and the FontInfo dictionary are different. One refers to the top of the underline rectangle and one to the center of it. * Align point would crash if the selected point were the end point of a contour (or if the two points around it were in the same place). * The baseline was not properly located when displaying it in the fontview. * The scripting command BitmapsAvail would generally cause FF to crash if done when there was a UI.. * We seem to be misimplementing my obsolete (sfd file) convention for having duplicate encodings point to the same glyph. Result was that occasionally a glyph would be removed and a pointer to something it refered to would be put in its place. * Change the name of activeFontInUI to activeFont Add an activeGlyph method. Add the ability to call a python script from a outline view. * Hmmm. If a textfield is shifted right, and then resized so there's now room for all the text, the unshift it. * Werner suggests that it would be useful to be able to specify wildcards in the goto dlg. * Michael Zedler tells me that glyphs output by mf2pt1 contain a line: % MF2PT1: bbox 0 90 834 422 where the third (so called) bounding box entry is actually the glyph's advance width. I was reluctant to use this at first, because that clearly isn't something that belongs in a bounding box... * Werner tells me that lilypond uses a slightly different syntax for the MF2PT1 bbox comment, so make our parsing slightly more generous. * When creating a new lookup subtable for an anchored lookup, it did not get marked as having anchor classes and feature file output failed because of that. * When outputing single lookups, the feature, script and language tags all had ^A where they should have had the second letter of the tag. * Remove the code to produce the old, broken, 'size' feature.
I have posted a new release of fontforge. This release represents a major change for fontforge. 1) OpenType features and lookups are handled quite differently now (and non-OpenType stuff has been forced into that mold so it's different too). The changelog goes through the major differences http://fontforge.sf.net/changelog.html 2) FontForge now supports python scripting. The (fontforge) python modules are described at http://fontforge.sf.net/python.html this is not well tested, because I'm not very familiar with python. Not all of the executables have been build with python (because I didn't know what the "standard" python version might be for that system or because I did not want to force people to download python in order to use fontforge. I would like to thank Apostolos Syropoulos, Lee Chenhwa, Michal Nowakowski, Philipp Poll, and Pierre Hanser for providing translations.
On Wed, 2007-03-14 at 19:01, George Williams wrote: > On Tue, 2007-03-13 at 07:40, George Williams wrote: > > Sometime later this week I hope to post an experimental build containing > > a major rewrite of the UI. > I had hoped that I would have time to finish rewriting the The metrics view has changed considerably. It displays all the features in the font, and allows you to select which ones you want active in the view. It lets you set the script & language. It will apply lookups that it couldn't handle previously like ligatures and contextuals. It does not do Indic glyph reordering. I'm not sure how to and last I checked MS had not updated their docs to reflect their new procedures.
On Tue, 2007-03-13 at 07:40, George Williams wrote: > Sometime later this week I hope to post an experimental build containing > a major rewrite of the UI. I had hoped that I would have time to finish rewriting the documentation, but it appears that is not to be. (I go on vacation tomorrow to run a marathon). Instead I shall post an experimental source tarball into the file release system (in the 12-March release), update the cvs tree, and write a few words here about the differences. The major change is that fontforge now presents lookups to the user rather than features. I think this makes simple things more difficult (which is why I avoided this when I started), but it makes complex things possible. Sadly the world is not simple. So when a piece of typographic information is created (a ligature, a kern pair, a glyph substitution, etc.) it must be tagged with a lookup (actually a lookup sub-table) rather than a feature tag. The lookup itself will be tagged with a feature tag (possibly several tags) and with scripts and languages in which that lookup should be active. NOTE: This reverses the way GPOS/GSUB think about things, but it contains the same information. The Font Info dialog now contains a Lookup pane which allows you to create and edit lookups and their subtables. You can also reorder them. The order shown in the dialog is the order in which they will be applied. A mac feature/setting subtable also gets converted into this format. The Font Info dialog no longer has Anchor Classes, Contextual, or State Machine panes. Instead you can edit a lookup subtable's data. There are new dialogs which list all the information for each lookup type (ie. a dialog which lists all kern pairs in a subtable), and these provide access to the old anchor class, contextual or state machine dialogs. The Glyph Info command has also changed. It looks simpler and more comprehensible (I think), but the act of creating a new substitution has become more complex because (potentially) one must create a new lookup and lookup subtable before doing the simple task of adding a new replacement glyph. The kerning class, contextual and state machine dialogs have all changed in that they no longer request a feature tag, they now need a lookup subtable. The metrics view also needs a subtable. And so do many other dialogs. Show ATT has changed, but it is still not editable. I hope that the Lookups pane will do that instead. There used to be a scripting command which indicated what ligature features got stored in afm files. Now each ligature lookup has a flag set on it which conveys this information. The Element->Typographic Features menu has been removed. It's functionality has moved into Font Info->Lookups (I hope I've got everything). Some scripting commands have been removed, others have been changed and others have been added. I apologize for this, as it will break existing scripts, but some basic concepts no longer exist and others, very different, have replaced them. Removed: DefaultATT ControlAfmLigatureOutput ApplySubstitutions CopyGlyphFeatures AddATT Replaced with AddPosSub RemoveATT GlyphInfo(Position/Pair/Substitution/AltSubs/MultSubs/Ligature) SelectByATT Replaced with SelectByPosSub Changed Set(V)Kern takes an optional third argument, a lookup subtable name (if not specified it choses one) AddAnchorClass(name,type,lookup-subtable-name) GetPosSub(subtable-name) AutoKern(spacing,threshold,subtable-name[,kernfile]) Added AddLookup(name,type,flags,feature-script-lang-array[,after-lookup-name]) n*[feature-tag,script-lang-array] n*[script-tag,lang-array] n*[lang] GetLookupInfo(lookup-name) => [type,flags,feature-script-lang-array] AddLookupSubtable(lookup-name,subtable-name[,after-subtable-name]) GetLookupOfSubtable(subtable-name) GetSubtableOfAnchorClass(anchor-class-name) AddPosSub(subtable-name,variant(s)) (subtable-name,dx,dy,dadv_x,dadv_y) (subtable-name,other-glyph-name,dx,dy...) RemoveLookupSubtable(subtable-name) RemoveLookup(lookup-name) MergeLookupSubtables(subtable-name1,subtable-name2) MergeLookups(lookup-name1,lookup-name2) SelectByPosSub(subtable-name,search_type) GetLookups("GPOS"/"GSUB") GetLookupSubtables(lookup-name) LookupStoreLigatureInAfm(lookup-name,store-it) LookupSetFeatureList(lookup-name,feature-script-lang-array) The sfd format has changed. New files are tagged as version 2. Old files will still work, but ff will no longer produce file in the old format. I'm not aware of any bugs... :-)

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Re: ?: double-byte font editor for Mac

From: Richard S. Cook ([email protected])
Date: Sat Jul 19 1997 - 08:52:53 EDT

Hi all.
Re the results of my previous queries. It seems that there is a PowerPC
native double-byte TT font editor included in the Hong Kong/Taiwan
localized release of the Mac OS (7.6T). This application *will not* run on
68k machines.

I have as yet not been able to test it (on a PPC), nor do I know how it
will function with versions of the CLK other than v.1.3 (see below), and
so my next questions:

Can someone who *has* used it please give a description of what it can do?
Can it be used, by whatever workaround, to modify/create an entire font?
Does it allow the user to assign new chars. to empty codepoints, and if
so, how many (is there an upper limit to the number of Chinese chars.),
and how is wordprocessing input of such new chars. handled?

Can anyone recommend a US vendor selling the Hong Kong/Taiwan localized
release of the Mac OS (7.6T) CD Package?

>> "TrueType Font Editor" from:
>> Apple Asia Chinese Language Kits (AACLK) Version 1.3.
>> (A.k.a. Mac OS 7.6T CD Package. T=Traditional Chinese.
>> The Package can install both CLK only or the full Chinese System.)
>> This AACLK 1.3 was only available in Taiwan, HongKong.

_____________________________
Richard S. Cook, Jr.
Somerville, MA USA 02144
email: [email protected]
http://world.std.com/~rscook/
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>*<<<<<<<<<<<<<<



This archive was generated by hypermail 2.1.2 : Tue Jul 10 2001 - 17:20:36 EDT

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

FontForge

Font editor created by George Williams

FontForge is a FOSSfont editor which supports many common font formats. Developed primarily by George Williams until 2012, FontForge is free software and is distributed under a mix of the GNU General Public License Version 3 and the 3-clause BSD license.[2] It is available for operating systems including Linux, Windows[3] and macOS[4] and is localized into 12 languages.

Features[edit]

To facilitate automated format conversion and other repetitive tasks, FontForge implements two scripting languages: its own language and Python.[5] FontForge can run scripts from its GUI, from the command line, and also offers its features as a Python module so it can be integrated into any Python program.[6]

FontForge supports Adobe's OpenType feature file specification (with its own extensions to the syntax).[7] It also supports the unofficial Microsoft mathematical typesetting extensions ( table)[8] introduced for Cambria Math and supported by Office 2007, XeTeX and LuaTeX. At least one free OpenType mathematical font has been developed in FontForge.

FontForge uses FreeType for rendering fonts on screen.[9] Since the November 15, 2008 release, FontForge uses libcairo and libpango software libraries for graphics and text rendering[10] providing anti-aliased graphics and complex text layout support.

FontForge can use Potrace or AutoTrace to auto trace bitmap images and import them into a font.

Parts of FontForge code are used by the LuaTeX typesetting engine for reading and parsing OpenType fonts.[11]

The FontForge source code includes a number of utility programs, including 'showttf' which shows the contents of binary font files, and a WOFF converter and deconverter.

Supported formats[edit]

FontForge supports a wide variety of font formats.[12] Its native Spline Font Database format ( file name extension) is text-based[13] and facilitates collaboration between designers, as difference files can be easily created. FontForge also supports the interoperable UFO source format, which is based on XML.

The software supports many other font formats and converts fonts from one format to another. Supported font formats include: TrueType (TTF), TrueType Collection (TTC), OpenType (OTF), PostScript Type 1, TeX Bitmap Fonts, X11 OTB bitmap (only sfnt), Glyph Bitmap Distribution Format (BDF), FON (Windows), FNT (Windows), and Web Open Font Format (WOFF). FontForge also imports and exports fonts to and from the Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format and the Unified Font Object (UFO) format.

Development history[edit]

The FontForge project was founded by George Williams as a retirement project, and initially published from 2001 to March 2004 as PfaEdit).[14][15]

Williams actively developed, maintained and supported the program and related utilities for around 12 years. In mid-2011, Dave Crossland began contributing to the project and the project moved from SourceForge to GitHub. Crossland began offering introductory type design workshops through the TeX Users Group (TUG) to raise funds to hire contract developers to maintain and develop the program. FontForge's development became more active, and Khaled Hosny and Barry Schwartz were notable contributors, but in late 2012 they and Crossland disagreed about the direction of the project so they forked FontForge as SortsMill Tools.[16]

In 2011, FontForge was packaged for easier installation on Mac OS X by Dr. Ben Martin with support from TUG. Meanwhile, Matthew Petroff published his Windows Build System and unofficial Windows builds. In 2013 the FontForgeBuilds project was started on SourceForge to extend this; it was subsequently entirely rewritten, and is today maintained by Jeremy Tan as a Windows application.

In 2012, Crossland organized a new project website to be hosted on GitHub Pages, fontforge.github.io, and used funds raised from teaching FontForge to beginners to hire a contract web designer. With his support Martin added a real time collaboration feature that was presented by them both as a keynote at the Libre Graphics Meeting 2013 in Madrid.

In 2014, with financial support from Google, Frank Trampe added full support for the UFO font source format.

Fonts developed with FontForge[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Releases · fontforge/fontforge · GitHub". GitHub. frank-trampe. Retrieved 2020-04-17.
  2. ^fontforge (8 October 2021). "fontforge/LICENSE at master · fontforge/fontforge · GitHub". GitHub.
  3. ^Gurdy Leete; Mary Leete (12 June 2007). Microsoft Expression Blend Bible. John Wiley & Sons. p. 295. ISBN . Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  4. ^James, Daniel (2009-12-04). Crafting Digital Media: Audacity, Blender, Drupal, GIMP, Scribus, and other Open Source Tools (1 ed.). Berkeley, CA: Apress. p. 114. ISBN .
  5. ^"Writing scripts to change fonts in FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  6. ^"Writing python scripts to change fonts in FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  7. ^"FontForge's implementation of Adobe's Feature File syntax". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  8. ^"MATH typesetting information". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. 2007-08-04. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  9. ^"Building FontForge from source". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  10. ^"Change log for FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  11. ^"LuaTeX — Taco Hoekwater, July 24, TUG 2008"(PDF). Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  12. ^Lunde, Ken (2009-01-13). CJKV Information Processing. Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly. p. 447. ISBN .
  13. ^"Spline Font Database File Format". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  14. ^Yannis Haralambous (3 October 2007). Fonts & Encodings (1 ed.). O'Reilly Media, Inc. pp. 444, 988. ISBN . Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  15. ^"The history of the development of FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Archived from the original on 2009-04-23. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  16. ^"SortMill Tools". Barry Schwartz. Retrieved 2015-02-27.
  17. ^"OSP-foundry» Blog Archive » Sans Guilt".
  18. ^"OSP (Open Source Publishing) →". osp.kitchen.

External links[edit]

Media related to Fontforge at Wikimedia Commons

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fontforge-testcases — A means to send large fonts to me without cluttering up -devel

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So I'm trying to make some test prints of my font from the Print dialog, using both the text display and the full font display. problems: In the text display output, the second page shows up as a totally different font. Also I can't seem to change the point size. With the full font display, most of the basic accented characters will not show up correctly. (rows 00C0 through 00F0) I've attached a font and its sample output PDFs to show what's happening. Using the November build for Mac OS X 10.4 ppc. -- -- Jason Pagura [email protected]
Hi, the attachment includes an .sfd source and a generated TTF font, illustrating the issues in the message "A few notes on generated TTF fonts" sent to the fontforge-devel list. Thanks, Maurizio M. Gavioli -- Maurizio M. Gavioli - VistaMare Software via San Bernardo 5, I-16030 Pieve Ligure, ITALY http://www.vistamaresoft.com/
Run and then see germandbls. If you then try pasting the AddInstrs statement for germandbls into the scripting window, it works fine.
Also sprach George Williams: > > [email protected]:/ph/2007/manual/philips$ fontforge 5.pfa > > Copyright (c) 2000-2005 by George Williams. > > Executable based on sources from 12:08 5-Dec-2005. > > Segmentation fault > >=20 > > I'm running this on Ubuntu 5.04. Pfa-file is attached. > Ok: > 1) The font file you sent contains many separate fonts > 2) Despite claims to the contrary there are no type1 fonts here > (the first font is a type42 font and ff can read it if you rem= ove > the others) > 3) The first font is followed by some code including the operator > pdfMakeFont. This is not listed in the PLRM as a valid operato= r > and is not defined in the file. >=20 > So, it's not a valid font file. It's not even valid PostScript. If y= ou > strip out the extraneous stuff ff works. Thanks for checking. The pfa file was generated by a script I found someplace -- attached for references -- but it's obviously not doint it= s job. Cheers, -h&kon H=E5kon Wium Lie [email protected] http://www.princexml.com/how= come
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hello I'v found 2 typos in nomen-en.c diff nomen-en.c* 2626c2626 < static char *str_ProbMultiName = "The this glyph has the same name as the glyph at encoding"; --- > static char *str_ProbMultiName = "This glyph has the same name as the glyph at encoding"; 2753c2753 < static char *str_MultipleUnicodePopup = "Check for muliple characters which use the same unicode code point\nOnly one glyph at a time (the one to be encoded) should have a given\nunicode code point"; --- > static char *str_MultipleUnicodePopup = "Check for multiple characters which use the same unicode code point\nOnly one glyph at a time (the one to be encoded) should have a given\nunicode code point"; there is also a new french translation, enriched + corrected for kashidé -- Pierre

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Fonts

Part I Chapter 6

Written by Zach Leatherman

Reviewed by John Teague and Aymen Loukil

Analyzed by Font Editor Archives s TJ Monserrat and Rick Viscomi

Edited by Barry Pollard

Introduction

Web fonts enable beautiful and functional typography on the web. Using web fonts not only empowers design, but it democratizes a subset of design, as it allows easier access to those who might not have particularly strong design skills. However, for all the good they can do, web fonts can also do great harm to your site’s performance if they are not loaded properly.

Are they a net positive for the web? Do they provide more benefit than harm? Are the web standards cowpaths sufficiently paved to encourage web font loading best practices by default? And if not, what needs to change? Let’s take a data-driven peek at whether or not we can answer those questions by inspecting how web fonts are used on the web today.

Where did you get those web fonts?

The first and most prominent question: performance. There is a whole chapter dedicated to performance but we will delve a little into font-specific performance issues here.

Using hosted web fonts enables ease of implementation and maintenance, but self-hosting offers the best performance. Given that web fonts by default make text invisible while the web font is loading (also known as the Flash of Invisible Text, or FOIT), the performance of web fonts can be more critical than non-blocking assets like images.

Are fonts being hosted on the same host or by a different host?

Differentiating self-hosting against third-party hosting is increasingly relevant in an HTTP/2 world, where the performance gap between a same-host and different-host connection can be wider. Same-host requests have the huge benefit of a better potential for prioritization against other same-host requests in the waterfall.

Recommendations to mitigate the performance costs of loading web fonts from another host include using the, and resource hints, but high priority web fonts should be same-host requests to Font Editor Archives s the performance impact of web fonts. This is especially important for fonts used by very visually prominent content or body copy occupying the majority of a page.

Popular web font hosting strategies.

Bar chart showing the popularity of third-party and self-hosting strategies for web fonts. 75% of mobile web pages use third-party hosts and 25% self-host. Desktop websites have similar usage.

The fact that three quarters are hosted is perhaps unsurprising given Google Fonts dominance that we will discuss below.

Google serves fonts using third-party CSS files hosted on. Developers add requests to these stylesheets using tags in their markup. While these stylesheets are render blocking, they are very small. However, the font files are hosted on yet another domain. The model of requiring two separate hops to two different domains makes a great option here for the second Font Editor Archives s that will not be discovered until the CSS is downloaded.

Note that while would be a nice addition to load the font files higher in the request waterfall (remember that sets up the connection, it doesn’t request the file content), Font Editor Archives s, is not yet available with Google Fonts. Google Fonts generates unique URLs for their font files which are subject to change.

What are the most popular third-party hosts?

HostDesktopMobile
fonts.gstatic.com75.4%74.9%
use.typekit.net7.2%6.6%
maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com1.8%2.0%
use.fontawesome.com1.1%1.2%
static.parastorage.com0.8%1.2%
fonts.shopifycdn.com0.6%0.6%
cdn.shopify.com0.5%0.5%
cdnjs.cloudflare.com0.4%0.5%
use.typekit.com0.4%0.4%
netdna.bootstrapcdn.com0.3%0.4%
fast.fonts.net0.3%0.3%
static.dealer.com0.2%0.2%
themes.googleusercontent.com0.2%0.2%
static-v.tawk.to0.1%0.3%
stc.utdstc.com0.1%0.2%
cdn.jsdelivr.net0.2%0.2%
kit-free.fontawesome.com0.2%0.2%
open.scdn.co0.1%0.1%
assets.squarespace.com0.1%0.1%
fonts.jimstatic.com0.1%0.2%

The dominance of Google Fonts here was simultaneously surprising and unsurprising at the same time. It was unsurprising in that I expected the service to be the most popular and surprising in the sheer dominance of its popularity. 75% of font requests is astounding. TypeKit was a distant single-digit second place, with the Bootstrap library accounting for an even more distant third place.

While the high usage of Google Fonts here is very impressive, it is also noteworthy that only 29% of pages included a Google Fonts element. This could mean a few things:

  • When pages uses Google Fonts, they use a lot of Google Fonts. They are provided without monetary cost, after all. Perhaps they’re being used in a popular WYSIWYG editor? This seems like a very likely explanation.
  • Or a more unlikely story is that it could mean that a lot of people are using Google Fonts with instead of .
  • Or if we want to go off the deep end into super unlikely scenarios, it could mean that many people are using Google Fonts with an HTTP Font Editor Archives s header instead.

Google Fonts documentation encourages the for the Google Fonts CSS to be placed as 4D Draw 6.0.x crack serial keygen first child in the of a page. This is a big ask! In practice, this is not common as only half a percent of all pages (about 20,000 pages) took this advice.

More so, Font Editor Archives s, if a page is using or as elements, Font Editor Archives s, these would come before the Google Fonts CSS anyway. Read on for more about these resource hints.

Speeding up third-party hosting

As mentioned above, a super easy way to speed up web font requests to a third-party host is to use the resource hint.

Wow! Less than 2% of pages are using ! Given that Google Fonts is at 75%, this should be higher! Developers: CrackORG - Page 4 of 32 - Get your Brand toolkit Now! you use Google Fonts, Font Editor Archives s, use ! Google Fonts: proselytize sandboxie license key 2020 Archives

In fact, if you’re using Google Fonts go ahead and add this to your if it’s not there already:

Most popular typefaces

RankFont familyDesktopMobile
1Open Sans24%22%
2Roboto15%19%
3Montserrat5%4%
4Source Sans Pro4%3%
5Noto Sans JP3%3%
6Lato3%3%
7Nanum Gothic4%2%
8Noto Sans KR3%2%
9Roboto Condensed2%2%
10Raleway2%2%
11FontAwesome1%1%
12Roboto Slab1%1%
13Noto Sans TC1%1%
14Poppins1%1%
15Ubuntu1%1%
16Oswald1%1%
17Merriweather1%1%
18PT Sans1%1%
19Playfair Display1%1%
20Noto Sans1%1%

It is unsurprising that the top entries here seem to match up very similarly to Google Fonts’ list of fonts sorted by popularity.

What font formats are being used?

WOFF2 is pretty well supported in web browsers today. Google Fonts serves WOFF2, a format that offers improved compression over its predecessor WOFF, which was itself already an improvement over other existing font formats.

Popularity of web font MIME types.

Bar chart showing the popularity of web Font Editor Archives s MIME types. WOFF2 is used on 74% of fonts, followed by 13% WOFF, 6% octet-stream, 3% TTF, 2% plain, 1% HTML, 1% SFNT, and fewer than 1% for all other types. Desktop and mobile have similar distributions.

From my perspective, Font Editor Archives s, an argument could be made to go WOFF2-only for web fonts after seeing the results here. I wonder where the double-digit WOFF usage is coming from? Perhaps developers still serving web fonts to Internet Explorer?

Third place (and a little further down) would seem to suggest that a lot of web servers are configured improperly, sending an incorrect MIME type with web font file requests.

Let’s dig a bit deeper and look at the values used in the property of declarations:

Popularity of font formats in @font-face <i>Font Editor Archives s</i> width=

Bar chart showing the popularity of formats used in font-face declarations. 69% of desktop pages’ @font-face declarations specify the WOFF2 format, 11% WOFF, 10% TrueType, 8% SVG, 2% EOT, Font Editor Archives s, and fewer than 1% OpenType, TTF, and OTF. The distribution for mobile pages is similar.

I was hoping to see SVG fonts on the decline, Font Editor Archives s. They’re buggy and implementations have been removed from every browser except Safari. Time to drop these, y’all.

The SVG data point here also makes me wonder what MIME type y’all are serving these SVG fonts with. I don’t see anywhere in Figure 6.7. Anyway, don’t worry about fixing that, just get rid of them!

WOFF2-only

RankFormat combinationsDesktopMobile
1woff284.0%81.9%
2svg, truetype, woff4.3%4.0%
3svg, truetype, woff, woff23.5%3.2%
4eot, svg, truetype, Font Editor Archives s, woff1.3%2.9%
5woff, woff21.8%1.8%
6eot, svg, truetype, woff, woff21.2%2.1%
7truetype, woff0.9%1.1%
8woff0.7%0.8%
9truetype0.6%0.7%
10truetype, woff, woff20.6%0.6%
11opentype, woff, woff20.3%0.2%
12svg0.2%0.2%
13eot, truetype, woff0.1%0.2%
14opentype, woff0.1%0.1%
15opentype0.1%0.1%
16eot0.1%0.1%
17opentype, svg, Font Editor Archives s, truetype, woff0.1%0.0%
18opentype, truetype, woff, woff20.0%0.0%
19eot, truetype, woff, woff20.0%0.0%
20svg, woff0.0%0.0%

This dataset seems to suggest that the majority of people are already using WOFF2-only in their blocks. But this is misleading of course, per our earlier discussion on the dominance of Google Fonts in the data set, Font Editor Archives s. Google Fonts does some sniffing methods to serve a streamlined CSS file and only includes the most modern. Unsurprisingly, WOFF2 dominates the results here for that reason, as browser support for WOFF2 has been pretty broad for some time now.

Importantly, this particular data doesn’t really support or detract from the case to go WOFF2-only yet, but it remains a tempting idea.

Fighting against invisible text

The number one tool we have to fight the default web font loading behavior of “invisible while loading” (also known as FOIT), is. Adding to your block is an easy way to tell the browser to show fallback text while the web font is loading.

Browser support is great too. Internet Explorer and pre-Chromium Edge don’t have support but they also render fallback text by default when a web font loads (no FOITs allowed here). For our Chrome tests, Font Editor Archives s, how commonly is used?

I assume this will be creeping up over time, especially now that Google Fonts is adding to all new code snippets copied from their site.

If you’re using Google Fonts, update your snippets! If you’re Font Editor Archives s using Google Fonts, use ! Read more about on MDN.

Let’s have a look at what values are popular:

Usage of font-display values.

Bar chart showing the usage of the font-display style. 2.6% of mobile pages Font Editor Archives s this style to1.5% to0.7% to0.4% to0.2% to optional, and 0.1% to enclosed in quotes, which is invalid. The desktop distribution is similar except usage is lower by 0.4 percentage points and usage is higher by 0.1 percentage points.

As an easy way to show fallback text while a web font is loading, reigns supreme and is the most common value. is also the default value used by new Google Fonts code snippets too. I would have expected (only render if cached) to have a bit more usage here as a few Font Editor Archives s developer evangelists lobbied for it a bit, but no dice.

How many web fonts are too many?

This is a question that requires some measure of nuance. How are the fonts being used? For how much content on the page? Where does this content live in the layout? How are the fonts being rendered? In lieu of nuance however let’s dive right into some broad and heavy handed analysis specifically centered on request counts.

Distribution of font requests per page.

Bar chart showing the distribution of font requests per page. The 10, 25, 50, 75, and 90th percentiles for desktop are: 0, 1, Font Editor Archives s, 3, 6, and 9 font requests. The distribution for mobile is identical until the 75th and 90th percentiles, Font Editor Archives s, where mobile pages request 1 fewer font.

The median web page makes three web font requests. At the 90th percentile, Font Editor Archives s, requested six and nine web fonts on mobile and desktop, respectively.

Histogram of web fonts requested per page.

Histogram showing the distribution of the number of font requests per page. The most popular number of font requests is 0 at 22% of desktop pages. The distribution drops to 9% of pages having 1 font, then crests at 10% for 2-4 fonts before falling as the number of fonts increases. The desktop and Font Editor Archives s distributions are similar, Font Editor Archives s, although the mobile distribution skews slightly toward having fewer fonts per page.

It does seem quite interesting that web font requests seem to be pretty steady across desktop and mobile. I’m glad to see the recommendation to hide blocks inside of a queries didn’t catch on (don’t get any ideas).

That said there are marginally more requests for fonts made on mobile devices. My hunch here is that fewer typefaces are available on mobile devices, Font Editor Archives s, which in turn means fewer hits in Google Fonts CSS, falling back to network requests for these.

You don’t want to win this award

The award for the page that requests the most web fonts goes to a site that made 718 web font requests!

After diving into the code, all of those 718 requests are going to Google Fonts! It looks like a malfunctioning “Above the Page fold” optimization plugin for WordPress has gone rogue on this site and is requesting (DDoS-ing?) all the Google Fonts—oops!

Ironic that a performance optimization plugin can make your performance much worse!

More accurate matching with

is a great CSS property to let the browser know specifically which code points the page would like to use in the font file. If the declaration has acontent on the page must match one of the code points in the range before the font is requested, Font Editor Archives s. It is a very good thing.

This is another metric that I expect was skewed by Google Fonts usage, as Google Fonts uses in most (if not all) of its CSS. I’d expect this to be less common in user land, but perhaps filtering out Google Fonts requests in the next edition of the Almanac may be possible.

Don’t request web fonts if a system font exists

is a nice way to reference a system font in yourFont Editor Archives s. If the font exists, it doesn’t need to make a request for a web font at all. This is used both extensively and controversially by Google Fonts, so it is likely another example of skewed data if we’re trying to glean patterns from user land.

It should also be noted here that it has been said by smarter people than I (Bram Stein of TypeKit) that using can be unpredictable as installed versions of fonts can be outdated and unreliable.

Condensed fonts and

Historically, has suffered from poor browser support and was not a well-known property. Read more about on MDN. But browser support has broadened.

It has been suggested that using condensed fonts on smaller viewports allows more text to be viewable, Font Editor Archives s, but this approach isn’t commonly used. That being said, that this property is used half a percentage point more on desktop than mobile is unexpected, and 7% seems much higher than I would have predicted.

Variable fonts are the future

Variable fonts allow several font weights and styles to be included in the one font file.

Even at 1.8% this was higher than expected, although I am excited to see this take off. Google Fonts v2 does include some support for variable fonts.

Usage of font-variation-settings axes.

Bar chart showing the usage of the font-variation-settings property. 42% of properties on desktop pages are set to the value, 32% to16% to2% or fewer to, and more. The most notable differences between desktop and mobile pages are 26% usage of38% ofFont Editor Archives s, and 23% of .

Through the lens of this large data set, Font Editor Archives s, these are very low sample sizes-take these results with a grain of salt. However, Font Editor Archives s, as the most common axis on desktop pages is notable, with and trailing. In my experience, the introductory demos for variable fonts are usually weight-based.

Color fonts might also be the future?

Usage here of these is basically nonexistent but you can check out the excellent resource Color Fonts! WTF? for more information. Similar (but not at all) to the SVG format for fonts (which is bad and going away), this allows you to embed SVG inside of OpenType files, Font Editor Archives s is awesome and cool.

Conclusion

The biggest takeaway here is that Google Fonts dominates the web font discussion. Approaches they’ve taken weigh heavily on the data we’ve recorded here. The positives here are easy access to web fonts, good font formats (WOFF2), and for-free configurations, Font Editor Archives s. Font Editor Archives s downsides here are performance drawbacks associated with third-party hosting, different-host requests, and no access to .

I fully expect that in the future we’ll see the “Rise of the Variable Font”, Font Editor Archives s. This should be paired with a decline in web font requests, as Variable Fonts combine multiple individual font files into a single composite font file. But history has shown us that what usually happens here is that we optimize a thing and then add more things to fill the vacancy.

It will be very interesting to see if color fonts increase in popularity. I expect these to be far more niche than variable fonts but may see a lifeline in the icon font space.

Keep those fonts frosty, y’all.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

FontForge

Font editor created by George Williams

FontForge is a FOSSfont editor which supports many common font formats. Developed primarily by George Williams until 2012, FontForge is free software and is distributed under a mix of the GNU General Public License Version 3 and the 3-clause BSD license.[2] It is available for operating systems including Linux, Windows[3] and macOS[4] and is localized into 12 languages, Font Editor Archives s.

Features[edit]

To facilitate automated format conversion and other repetitive tasks, FontForge implements two scripting languages: its own language and Python.[5] FontForge can run scripts from its GUI, from the command line, and also offers its features as a Python module so it can be integrated into any Python program.[6]

FontForge supports Adobe's OpenType feature file specification (with its own extensions to the syntax).[7] It also supports the unofficial Microsoft mathematical typesetting extensions ( table)[8] introduced for Cambria Math and supported by Office 2007, XeTeX and LuaTeX. At least one free OpenType mathematical font has been developed in FontForge.

FontForge uses FreeType for rendering fonts on screen.[9] Since the November 15, 2008 release, FontForge REAPER Crack 6.34 Key With Keygen Full Torrent Download 2021 libcairo and libpango software libraries for graphics and text rendering[10] providing anti-aliased graphics and complex text layout support.

FontForge can use Potrace or AutoTrace to auto trace bitmap images and import them into a font.

Parts of FontForge code are used by the LuaTeX typesetting engine for reading and parsing OpenType fonts.[11]

The FontForge source code includes a number of utility programs, including 'showttf' which shows the contents of binary font files, and a WOFF converter and deconverter.

Supported formats[edit]

FontForge supports a wide variety of font formats.[12] Its native Spline Font Database format ( file name extension) is text-based[13] and facilitates collaboration between designers, as difference files can be easily created, Font Editor Archives s. FontForge also supports the interoperable UFO source format, which is based on XML.

The software supports many other font formats and converts fonts from one format to another. Supported font formats include: TrueType (TTF), TrueType Collection (TTC), OpenType (OTF), PostScript Type 1, Font Editor Archives s, TeX Bitmap Fonts, X11 OTB bitmap (only sfnt), Glyph Bitmap Distribution Format (BDF), FON (Windows), FNT (Windows), and Web Open Font Format (WOFF). FontForge also imports and exports fonts to and from the Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format and the Unified Font Object (UFO) format.

Development history[edit]

The FontForge project was founded by George Williams as a retirement project, and initially published from 2001 to March 2004 as PfaEdit).[14][15]

Williams actively developed, maintained and supported the program and related utilities for around 12 years, Font Editor Archives s. In mid-2011, Dave Crossland began contributing to the project and the project moved from SourceForge to GitHub. Crossland began offering introductory type design workshops through the TeX Users Group (TUG) to raise funds to hire contract developers to maintain and develop the program. FontForge's development became more active, and Khaled Hosny and Barry Schwartz were notable contributors, but in late 2012 they and Crossland disagreed about the Font Editor Archives s of the project so they forked FontForge as SortsMill Tools.[16]

In 2011, FontForge was packaged for easier installation on Mac OS X by Dr. Ben Martin with support from TUG. Meanwhile, Matthew Petroff published his Windows Build System and unofficial Font Editor Archives s builds. Font Editor Archives s 2013 the FontForgeBuilds project was started on SourceForge to extend this; it was subsequently entirely rewritten, and is today maintained by Jeremy Tan as a Windows application.

In 2012, Font Editor Archives s, Crossland organized a new project website to be hosted on GitHub Pages, fontforge.github.io, and used funds raised from teaching FontForge to beginners to hire a contract web designer. With his support Martin added a real time collaboration feature that was presented by them both as a keynote at the Libre Graphics Meeting 2013 in Madrid.

In 2014, with financial support from Google, Frank Trampe added full support for the UFO font source format, Font Editor Archives s.

Fonts developed with FontForge[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Releases · fontforge/fontforge · GitHub". GitHub. frank-trampe. Retrieved 2020-04-17.
  2. ^fontforge (8 October 2021). "fontforge/LICENSE at master · fontforge/fontforge · GitHub". GitHub.
  3. ^Gurdy Leete; Mary Leete (12 June 2007). Microsoft Expression Blend Bible. John Wiley & Sons. p. 295. ISBN . Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  4. ^James, Daniel (2009-12-04). Crafting Digital Media: Audacity, Font Editor Archives s, Blender, Drupal, GIMP, Scribus, and other Open Source Tools (1 ed.). Berkeley, Font Editor Archives s, CA: Apress. p. 114. ISBN .
  5. ^"Writing scripts to change fonts in FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  6. ^"Writing python scripts to change fonts in FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net, Font Editor Archives s. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  7. ^"FontForge's implementation of Adobe's Feature File syntax". Fontforge.sourceforge.net, Font Editor Archives s. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  8. ^"MATH typesetting information". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. 2007-08-04. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  9. ^"Building FontForge from source". Fontforge.sourceforge.net, Font Editor Archives s. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  10. ^"Change log for FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  11. ^"LuaTeX — Taco Hoekwater, July 24, Font Editor Archives s, TUG 2008"(PDF). Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  12. ^Lunde, Font Editor Archives s, Ken (2009-01-13). CJKV Information Processing. Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly. p. 447. ISBN .
  13. ^"Spline Font Database File Format", Font Editor Archives s. Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  14. ^Yannis Haralambous (3 October 2007). Fonts & Encodings (1 ed.). O'Reilly Media, Inc. pp. 444, 988. ISBN . Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  15. ^"The history of the development of FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Archived from the original on 2009-04-23. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  16. ^"SortMill Tools". Barry Schwartz. Retrieved 2015-02-27.
  17. ^"OSP-foundry» Blog Archive » Sans Guilt".
  18. ^"OSP (Open Source Publishing) →", Font Editor Archives s. osp.kitchen.

External links[edit]

Media related to Fontforge at Wikimedia Commons

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

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[image: org.fontforge.FontForge.png] Hi, all. On Wednesday, November 7th, 2000, George W. Williams V first published a piece of software called PfaEdit that allowed rudimentary editing of PostScript fonts. It lacked the features and polish of such prominent products as Fontographer and Font Studio, but it had one big advantage: it was free. Twenty years later, Fontographer and FontStudio are gone, and the whereabouts of George Williams are unknown, but FontForge has grown into a highly capable and mature product. It supports dozens of file formats and includes such features as spline stroking, overlap removal, and Python scripting. And it is still free software. With over 100,000 users, it is the most widely used typeface design tool in the world, Font Editor Archives s. It may seem anti-climactic that today's 20th anniversary release includes no major changes or new features, but it perfectly befits a product that has evolved carefully and slowly over its entire lifecycle with almost no breaking changes. Whether for the special commemorative splash screen or for the countless small improvements and fixes, we hope that you will try it. It is available, as always, on the FontForge website <https://fontforge.org/>. The entire project team thank you for your support. Best wishes, Frank Font Editor Archives s org.fontforge.FontForge.png] Hi, Font Editor Archives s, all. I am happy to announce the March 2020 release of FontForge. Changes include the following. - FontForge now has much improved stroke expansion functionality. The main change is that it actually works most of the time. New features include support for arbitrary convex nibs and the miter-clip and arc join styles from SVG 2. All functionality is accessible from the Python and native APIs, Font Editor Archives s. (By Skef Iterum.) - Font Editor Archives s overlap handles certain important edge cases better. (By Skef Iterum and Frank Trampe.) - The Python API now has a function called `genericGlyphChange` that matches the "Change Glyph" command in the GUI. See #4133 for more details. (By Skef Iterum.) - The Python API now has functions for getting Unicode script and for interrogating glyph boundaries. (By Fred Brennan.) - One can now use text flags (rather than just numerical flags) when opening a font file via the Python API. (By Skef Iterum.) - UFO import now outputs the note field properly, Font Editor Archives s. (By Skef Iterum.) - SVG import is much more robust. (By Skef Iterum.) - We have dropped most gnulib and autotools logic in favor of CMake, which dramatically simplifies the build system and just as dramatically improves build time. (By Jeremy Tan.) - As part of the switch to CMake, per the deprecation of Python 2, Font Editor Archives s, and per the lack of objections to the proposal on the mailing list, we have dropped support for building FontForge with Python 2 support. The non-build-system Python 2 code remains, but it is neither tested nor maintained nor supported and is likely to follow a trajectory of decay and then removal. - Documentation is now rendered in Sphinx, which makes maintenance and improvement easier. (By Jeremy Tan.) - Translations now happen on crowdin, which makes contributions easier. (By Jeremy Tan.) - We got such a contribution for Croatian. (By Milo Ivir.) - Character view point coloring is more consistent, and preview fills support transparency. (By Skef Iterum.) - The user can now move and close tabs in the character view. (By Fred Brennan.) - The metrics view now allows for entry of negative kerning values and runs a bit more smoothly. (By Fred Brennan.) - There is now a warning when a user is about to discard an unsaved script. (By Fred Brennan.) - We fixed bugs all over, Font Editor Archives s, as always, with particular attention given to the metrics view, Python, Spiro, and high-resolution displays. Go to the FontForge website <https://fontforge.org/> to get the right package for your system. Best wishes, Frank
Yes. The build process broke in the midst of other changes. They will be ready with the next release. Please try the AppImage if that works. On Mon, Apr 15, 2019 at 10:11 AM Mauro Sacchetto <[email protected]> wrote: > .deb packages are not yet ready? > thanx > > ms > > Il 13/04/19 12:45, Font Editor Archives s, T J ha scritto: > > Hi all, > > > > FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. > > > > This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Most > > notably, it resolves a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that > > contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has > > also been removed. > > > > The source tarball, Font Editor Archives s, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) Font Editor Archives s Windows binaries are all > > available from https://fontforge.github.io. > > > > Thanks, > > > > Jeremy > > > > > > > > _______________________________________________ > > Fontforge-announce mailing list > > [email protected] > > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce > > > > > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
I did not issue notes for the previous release since a new one was imminent anyway. I am attaching them here, Font Editor Archives s. - The user interface is now able to use GDK instead of X11, which means much smoother operation on Windows and Macintosh. Font Editor Archives s UFO 2 and UFO 3 are now handled as separate formats, which allows us to support more of the UFO 3 format. Some workflows may need adjustment as a result. See this bulletin <http://fontforge.github.io/en-US/bulletins/ufo3_2018_1/> for more information. - FontForge now tolerates a much wider range of syntax in feature files. - FontForge can now import and export WOFF2. - FontForge now supports Unicode 12.1.0. - The Python interface now allows finer interaction with splines. On Sun, Font Editor Archives s, Apr 14, Font Editor Archives s, 2019 at 3:43 AM T J <[email protected]> wrote: > Hi all, Font Editor Archives s, > > > > FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. > > > > This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Most > notably, it resolves a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that > contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has > also been removed. > > > > The source tarball, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) and Windows binaries are all > available from https://fontforge.github.io. > > > > Thanks, > > Jeremy > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce Font Editor Archives s
.deb Font Editor Archives s are not yet ready? thanx ms Il 13/04/19 12:45, Font Editor Archives s, T J ha scritto: > Hi all, > > FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. > > This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Font Editor Archives s > notably, it resolves a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that > contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has > also been removed. > > The source tarball, Font Editor Archives s, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) and Windows binaries are all > available from https://fontforge.github.io. > > Thanks, > > Jeremy > > > > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
Hi all, FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Most notably, it Font Editor Archives s a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has also been removed. The source tarball, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) and Windows binaries are all available from https://fontforge.github.io. Thanks, Jeremy
Hello, my characters are already drawn with Illustrator, which is my favorite vector program. Unfortunately copy + paste Font Editor Archives s Illu to Fontforge doesn’t work (on my Mac). Is there any solution? Thanks in advance! Friendly Greetz Peter Hübner Homepage: http://PH-Layout.de E-Mail: [email protected]
Hi, Judith. The announcement list is only for release announcements, so incoming mail only goes to the list administrators rather than to the user community, Font Editor Archives s. If you want community support, I would suggest joining the users list <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-users>. I also don't understand your question, but I'll inquire further when you post there. Best wishes, Frank On Thu, Font Editor Archives s, Oct Fallout 4 Crack Plus Activation Key Free Download Latest Full Version 2021, 2016 at 11:19 PM, Font Editor Archives s, Dr. Judith Martha Prewitt < [email protected]> wrote: > Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook > on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in > LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? > > Judith Prewitt > > > ------------------------------------------------------------ > ------------------ > Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most > engaging tech sites, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
Hi Judith, Here's something similar: http://superuser.com/questions/490922/merging-two-fonts Mike On 21 October 2016 at 16:16, Adobe After Effects Crack Full Free Download Wallbridge <[email protected]> wrote: > Hi Judith, > > For some reason I don't understand, your question about merging fonts came > into my inbox, Font Editor Archives s. I'm not a techy so don't know exactly what you mean but I > may have done something similar of late in editing a font to use certain > symbols I wanted to bring in for the purpose of music annotations, Font Editor Archives s. It was a > case of feeling my way along but ended up being much easier than I thought. > Anyway I used a free Mac app called FontForge and it was very intuitive, > though you Font Editor Archives s need to install XQuartz first. If you open a ttf font into > Font Forge you get basically a map of the keys and the symbols within and > can edit them by using copy and paste. So by opening up two fonts you can > shift symbols around to get what you're after. Very straightforward. The > file you end up with doesn't have the ttf suffix (I can't remember what it > is) but you can easily go on-line and find a converter. Rename the "new" > font and put it in the font folder. It should work with both Pages and > LibreOffice. I hope this helps. > > Cheers > Mike > > On 21 October 2016 at 05:19, Font Editor Archives s. Judith Martha Prewitt < > [email protected]> wrote: > >> Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook >> on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in >> LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? >> >> Judith Prewitt >> >> >> ------------------------------------------------------------ >> ------------------ >> Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most >> engaging tech sites, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot Font Editor Archives s _______________________________________________ >> Fontforge-announce mailing list >> [email protected], Font Editor Archives s. >> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >> Font Editor Archives s >
Hi Judith, For some reason I don't understand, Font Editor Archives s, your question about merging fonts came into my inbox, Font Editor Archives s. I'm not a techy so don't know exactly what you mean but I may have done something similar of late in editing a font to use certain symbols I wanted to bring in for the purpose of music annotations. It was a case of feeling my way along but ended up being much easier than I thought. Anyway I used a free Mac app called FontForge and it was very intuitive, though you do need to install XQuartz first. If you open a ttf font into Font Forge you get basically a map of the keys and the symbols within and can edit them by using copy and paste. So by opening up two fonts you can shift symbols around to get what you're after. Very straightforward. The file you end up with doesn't have the ttf suffix (I can't remember what it is) but you can easily go on-line and find a converter. Rename the "new" font and put it in the font folder. It should work with both Pages and LibreOffice. I hope this helps. Cheers Mike On 21 October 2016 at 05:19, Dr. Judith Martha Prewitt < [email protected]> wrote: > Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook > on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in > LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? > > Judith Prewitt > > > ------------------------------------------------------------ > ------------------ > Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most > engaging tech sites, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? Judith Prewitt
Can the new version be compiled to run on earlier versions of Mac OSX than 10.10? On Tue, Oct 4, 2016 at 7:09 AM, Frank Trampe Font Editor Archives s wrote: > [image: Inline image 1] > Hi, folks. > > I'm happy to announce the October release of FontForge, a little late > perhaps, but worth the wait. It brings a number of changes. > > - The modern-looking theme featured on the website, created by Andreas > Larsen, now ships by default with FontForge. All old themes continue to > work. > - Handling of CID ranges, certain bitmap typeface formats, and spline > stroking is better and more consistent. > - FontForge now supports Unicode 9.0, Font Editor Archives s. > - We (and I mean mostly Jeremy Tan) fixed a number of user interface > quirks. > - And we fixed some crashes, Font Editor Archives s. > > > Go to the FontForge website <http://fontforge.github.io/en-US/> to get > the right package for your platform. > > Best wishes, > > Frank > > > ------------------------------------------------------------ > ------------------ > Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most > engaging tech sites, Font Editor Archives s, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce > > -- -- Jason Pagura zimbach at gmail dot com
[image: Inline image 1] Hi, folks. I'm happy to announce the October release of FontForge, a little late perhaps, but worth the wait. It brings a number of changes. - The modern-looking theme featured on the website, created by Andreas Larsen, now ships by default with FontForge. All old themes continue to work. - Handling of CID ranges, Font Editor Archives s, certain bitmap typeface formats, and spline stroking is better and more consistent. - FontForge now supports Unicode 9.0, Font Editor Archives s. - We (and I mean mostly Jeremy Tan) fixed a number of user interface quirks. - Font Editor Archives s we fixed some crashes. Go to the FontForge website <http://fontforge.github.io/en-US/> to get the right package for your platform. Best wishes, Frank
----- Khaled Hosny <[email protected]> Windows Archives - Page 3 of 3 - All Latest Crack Software Free Download > On Mon, Feb 21, 2011 at 07:25:31PM -0800, Font Editor Archives s, George Williams wrote: > > I've packaged up a new release of fontforge. > > Great! Not so great. I left out two patches. There's a new, new release now please use it instead.
I've packaged up a Font Editor Archives s release of fontforge.
I fear I no longer have time to provide (and support) binary releases, so the current release is source (and documentation) only.
I have, I hope, posted a new release of fontforge. Sourceforge Font Editor Archives s changed it's release upload mechanism. It no longer seems possible to have sourceforge send out automatic emails announcing this fact. More troubling, sourceforge claims there is a 15 minute delay between Font Editor Archives s posting files and them being available for release. It has been several hours, and at the moment only three of the files I posted are displayed. Perhaps it takes longer than 15 minutes. Perhaps something more is broken.
[email protected] skribis: > The first time you run fontforge with Pango something takes several > minutes to initialize itself. This delay does not occur on > subsequent invocations. Building a font cache, Font Editor Archives s, perhaps, especially if it isn't depending on fontconfig for all the font info and so has to open all the fonts for itself. One has to wait similarly while LuaTeX uses fontforge code to build a font cache. :)
First release with Pango and Cairo. The first time you run fontforge with Pango something takes several minutes to initialize itself. This delay does not occur on subsequent invocations. The version of Cairo available from fink on the mac is so old that FontForge can't use it. The default fontconfig setup on the mac does not seem to find any outline fonts (reverting to bitmaps), Font Editor Archives s. Create a ~/.fonts directory yourself, and put some fonts there. Pango crashes on my cygwin system, so the cygwin build does not contain either Pango or Cairo.
Support for Adobe's proposed cmap format=14 subtable (variation selectors) Support for making fontforge a python extension.
31-August-2007 * New traditional Chinese translation of the UI by Wei-Lun Chao. * Updated Vietnamese translation by Clytie Siddall. * Removed the old MetaFont command (which didn't work) and replaced it with a styles menu (incorporating the old Effects menu, and a command to change weight, to condense/extend, and to oblique. Added python scripting commands {font,glyph}.{changeWeight,condenseExtend} * Lots of new work on the truetype autoinstructor by Alexej and Michal. * Add a validation dialog which can be run just before generating a font. * Try a different algorithm for approximating splines by line segments (for drawing them in the outline glyph view and elsewhere), Font Editor Archives s. This one should show symmetry better. * Provide the ability to ask freetype to rasterize glyphs without hints in the Print/Display dlg (even if the glyphs have hints, rasterize them without). * Oh dear, rasterizing stroked fonts only worked if multilayer was defined, Font Editor Archives s. * Try Font Editor Archives s improve display of stroked fonts. * When stroking splines don't let miter joins grow excessively. * FF would remove instructions from glyphs that had at least two contours the first of which started with a control point. * Add a short cut for Hide Grid in the metrics view. * Python 2.5 initializes itself differently from Python 2.[34]. 2.[34] delay the init until an import happens, while 2.5 does it at start up. I just assumed that when I called Py_Initialize that it did so. This led to a crash on 2.[34] when I tried to use my types before the user had tried to import fontforge. * Further improvements to tile path. * When moving a control point in a ttf font where one side of the cp was a real point, I would allow an implicit point on the far side of the real point to become real. * When dragging truetype points around, Font Editor Archives s, adjacent implicit points would remain where they were (and not be implicit any longer). * FF would randomly crash after removing a lot of glyphs. * The knife tool Font Editor Archives s not cut a contour if it landed on a point. * Trying to add a stylename to the size Font Editor Archives s of fontinfo generally caused a crash. * All blank lines in the display dlg had the same line spacing as that of the first character displayed in the dlg. * I don't think feature files where handling classes defined with '-' properly, Font Editor Archives s. * Read the "lib" structures from UFO/GLIF files into our python persistant data. (And write our persistant data out if it's a dict), Font Editor Archives s. * Add the ability to call hooks (python functions) when various fontforge events take place, Font Editor Archives s. * Make fontforge's basic types (Point, Font Editor Archives s, Contour, and Layer) be picklable so they can now be saved in an sfd file. * Oops. With the inclusion of the library check argument, ff would not compile if NODYNAMIC were set. * FontForge now stores the "userdata" python members into the sfd file as pickled objects. (FontForge's own types are not currently pickleable), Font Editor Archives s. * Add the ability to mark a glyph so that just before being saved its references will be unlinked and we will run remove overlap on it, Font Editor Archives s. This means the user can work with the references (and get the automatic updating they confer) and still not have a self-intersecting glyph in the output (think Aring, Ccedilla, Eogonek). * Create a fontlint script file. * When dumping both apple and opentype bitmap tables if there were a BDF table, then we'd get garbage for 'bloc'/'bhed'. * Add some user interface commands to python, and more importantly, add the ability to create menu items which will invoke python scripts, and the ability to add import/export conversion filters (again, python scripts). * Counter hints for LCG glyphs came out wrong if Font Editor Archives s had not been applied first. * Counter masks were not read out of sfd files properly. * Selecting a counter mask in Glyph Info caused FF to crash. * The Execute Script dlg would sometimes complain about invalid scrollbar size when it got closed. * AddAnchorPoint (scripting command) should be prepared to cast real args to integers, Font Editor Archives s. * Just as I needed a special "in use" pass of GSUB when reading from a TTC, so I also need an "in use" pass of the MATH table. * All this time and I've mapped "nonmarkingreturn" (GID=2) to Unicode+000C instead of Unicode+000D. I'm a twit. Font Editor Archives s * I have merged (and substantially rewritten) the Print and Display Dialogs. There is now only one menu item (Print) which (vaguely) the old Display dlg except that it can now be printed. The text area widget now supports OpenType features just as the metrics view does, Font Editor Archives s. It also supports ligature carets. Font Editor Archives s The dialog is no longer modal, however it does not get updated with each change to the font (that would make moving a point around in the outline view far too sluggish), instead there is a [Refresh] button the user can press to force an update. * It occurred to me that fontforge's current mechanism for setting ligature carets requires that there be a ligature substitution is the exact number of components used to make the glyph. But in indic fonts ligatures are often made up out of other ligatures (I think) which means that there won't be enough caret positions. So I've added a Ligature Caret count to the Element->Glyph Info dialog to give the user control over it when necessary. * Add minimal support for applying apple state machine lookups in metrics view, Font Editor Archives s. Support is minimal because: * Apple seems to figure line breaks before doing substitution process but I do it afterward so I don't know where the line breaks are and I can't enter either the line start or line end state. * When I delete a glyph I delete it, Font Editor Archives s. Apple inserts a deleted glyph mark and then removes that later. State machines can respond to deleted glyphs, but I can't. * I don't try to figure out which feature,settings should be on by default. So the user must pick them out manually. Font Editor Archives s * Add popup graphics to the Glyph Info and Lookup subtable dialogs to show substitutions (that is if there is an entry like 'smcp' a => a.sc then create a popup window showing the "a" glyph and the "a.sc" so the user can see what happens. * Another futile attempt at an embolden command. Element->Embolden * Add shortcuts to the anchor control dlg (Page Up/Page Down) to move to the next/previous glyph. * Michal Nowakowski has improved the truetype autoinstructor. He warns that it probably still has bugs (as what does not?) so I am leaving the old code available for now. He says it works best in "a clean (uninstructed) font with well defined blue zones and stems". * If we have a glyph with multiple encodings, and the secondary encodings occur after the primary ones, then the backmap will probably contain a secondary encoding, which means that when we go to load the font in we will probably notice the secondary encoding twice and forget the primary. * I used not to distinguish between ligature anchors and normal mark to base anchors. Unfortunately when I moved to lookups HD Tune Pro Crack v5.85 With License Key Free Download [2021] (from features) I had to introduce that distinction. But Font Editor Archives s Charles Proxy 4.6.2.7 Full Crack & License Key 2021 Latest Version Download didn't work through all the implications and have fixed a number of bugs related to that, Font Editor Archives s. * Barry SCHWARTZ complains that font info says "fontnames must" but that the cited adobe tech note only says "should". So change "must" to "should". * When processing class-based contextual lookups fontforge could not handle class 0 (the class containing "all glyphs not in another class") add code to do that. * If the user did not select a Gasp Version (note: active Towards The Stars Free Download selection was needed, just seeing that it was correct and leaving it didn't work) then [OK] would leave the font with an invalid version and on some systems caused a crash. * View->Insert Glyph After didn't work well on a ligature glyph. It would insert the glyph after the first component of the ligature, not after the last -- which would make more sense. * Misnamed some private dict entries when loading from otf. * Make entry of ghost hints better. * Add the ability to determine whether a point is selected or not from python. * Add a mechanism so the user can ask fontforge to check for the existance of optional libraries. * Add range checks to some library routines which blindly referenced some BMP arrays with codepoints outside bmp. Broken by UCS2->UCS4 change. * Werner wants GotoChar to be Font Editor Archives s to switch sub-fonts in a cid keyed font. This may introduce bugs. * Revert glyph still wasn't working, Font Editor Archives s. * Someone complained that using a negative stroke took a very long time but produced correct results. Um. Ok. It's easy always to Font Editor Archives s use the absolute value. * Oops, Font Editor Archives s. The mac uses UCS2 for filenames, so when I moved to UCS4 I should have changed the mac resource file interface. * When creating a mac resource file we only set the type/creator fields and failed to initialize the finderFlags. * Fixed crash bug in generating a cursive connection anchor sub-table, Font Editor Archives s. * In TrueType composite glyphs with the USE_MY_METRICS bit set the lock icon wasn't scrolled properly. * The change from UCS2 to UCS4 Minecraft 1.17 Cracked Download Launcher | Pro Version 2021 text copy/paste. We failed to add a terminating NUL of the right size in all cases We continued to use charset=UCS-2 when it should have been UCS-4 * FF crashed when trying to View->Show ATT on a font that appears to me to contain an invalid 'kern' sub-table. I have removed the proximate cause of the crash. I have provided a warning that the kern table appears invalid. And I have cleaned up my internals after detecting the bad sub-table (I had a lookup with a feature but no script and this caused problems). * Multiple substitutions in the metrics view did not properly update the count of glyphs to be displayed. * If nothing changed in the metrics input field and the output contained a ligature (or a mult subs I suspect), Font Editor Archives s. FF would complain. Font Editor Archives s * in python, octane c4d torrent Archives didn't work. The PyArg_ParseTupleAndKeywords behaves in a way I did not expect. * [Bottom] and [Down] still didn't work for lookup subtables. * Try to force the text field in the metricsview to a fixed size. In some fonts it seems to be initialized to a huge value. * Add ability to display italic side bearings in the char view. Font Editor Archives s The lines drawn for italic fonts to show the italic origin and Font Editor Archives s width were at slightly the wrong Font Editor Archives s (I used a sine when I should have used a tangent). * If a font did not have any horizontal metrics then ff would not set the em-size. * Show Att trampled on memory when displaying apple contextual substitution state machines. * Wasn't parsing Font Editor Archives s 'lcar' table properly. * if a font contained a 'post' table but didn't name all names (or something like that), then the attempt to name the glyph based on the encoding was broken after the encoding change, Font Editor Archives s. * FF did not recognize that a bdf file was greymaped. Broken by the bdf properties work a year ago or so. * The import lookups button in fontinfo forgot about the subtables (sort of). * The metricsview used the wrong count field to determine whether things changed. It used the glyph count, not the char count (which meant that when we had a ligature and the number of chars was greater than the number of glyphs, things got confused.) * In the metrics view, anchored attachments only worked if the base glyph were itself unmoved (that is the mark was placed relative to the unmoved location, not the actual location). * Font Editor Archives s search dialog should provide user with control over the error bound, Font Editor Archives s. The rotate checkbox didn't work if the flip checkbox wasn't checked. * If a replace contour added a control point to a point that did not have one (went from a line to a curve) then that control point would get lost. If a search matched across the start point of a contour then search/replace could go into an infinite loop if the search and replace paths were the same. Softube Plugins v2.2.76 Crack (Win/Mac) Torrent Free Download * Find/Replace (replace) didn't work pc helpsoft driver updater serial number  to quadratic splines. * Add two python methods: * Layer.interpolateNewLayer(other-layer,amount) * Font.createInterpolatedGlyph(glyph1,glyph2,amount) The first creates a new layer by interpolating between the current layer and the layer in the first argument. The second creates a new glyph in the font by interpolating between the first two arguments, Font Editor Archives s. The glyph's unicodecode point and name will be copied from the first argument (the font must not already contain this glyph). If amount is 0 the result will look like the first glyph, if 1 then like the second. * When recovering from a crash, FF would sometimes complain about a mismatched version number. Don't, Font Editor Archives s. Font Editor Archives s * Problems parsing 'mort' tables could cause a crash. * When building a contextual lookup, don't list that lookup as something that it could invoke (ie. list all lookups in this table (GPOS/GSUB) except for ourselves). Don't want to encourage users to create infinite lookup loops. * Point matching didn't work when there were references to references and multiple references within a Font Editor Archives s. * FF was having problems with extension lookups with multiple sub tables. * We were trying to print a trailing NUL in some strings from the fontview, Font Editor Archives s. * Kerning by classes got broken in metricsview by the addition of support for device tables, Font Editor Archives s. * A GPOS contextual lookup only listed GSUB lookups in the lookup/sequence dlg Pressing [OK] in the lookup/sequence dlg caused a crash if no lookup selected. * Openfontdlg was looking at the filter listbutton rather than the rename namelist listbutton. * mf2pt1 now uses "glyph_dimensions" rather than "bbox" * The metrics view should now handle device tables. Font Editor Archives s * Goto could crash when used on small encodings. * -lang wasn't permitted before -c, Font Editor Archives s. * Use numeric text fields for anchor positioning. * Graham Asher points out that the meanings of underline position in the 'post' table and the FontInfo dictionary are different. Font Editor Archives s One refers to the top of the underline rectangle and one to the center of it. * Align point would crash if the selected point were the end point of a contour (or if the two points around it were in the same place). * The baseline was not properly located when displaying it in the fontview. * The scripting command BitmapsAvail would generally cause FF to crash if done when there was a UI. * We seem to be misimplementing my obsolete (sfd file) convention for having duplicate encodings point to the same glyph. Result was that occasionally a glyph would be removed and a pointer to something it refered to would be put in its place. * Change the name of activeFontInUI to activeFont Add an activeGlyph method. Add the ability to call a python script from a outline view. * Hmmm. If a textfield is shifted right, and then resized so there's now room for all the text, the unshift it. * Werner suggests that it would be useful to be able to specify wildcards in the goto dlg, Font Editor Archives s. * Michael Zedler tells me that glyphs output by mf2pt1 contain a line: % MF2PT1: bbox 0 90 834 422 where the third Font Editor Archives s called) bounding box entry is actually the glyph's advance width. I was reluctant to use this at first, because that clearly isn't something that belongs in a bounding box., Font Editor Archives s. * Werner tells me that lilypond uses a slightly different syntax for the MF2PT1 bbox comment, so make our parsing slightly more Font Editor Archives s generous. * When creating a new lookup subtable for an anchored lookup, Font Editor Archives s, it did not get marked as having anchor classes and feature file output failed because of that. * When outputing single lookups, Font Editor Archives s, the feature, script and language tags all had ^A where they should have had the second letter of the tag. * Remove the code to produce the old, broken, 'size' feature.
I have posted a new release of fontforge. This release represents a major change for fontforge. 1) OpenType features and lookups are handled quite differently now (and non-OpenType stuff has been forced into that mold so it's different too). The changelog goes through the major differences http://fontforge.sf.net/changelog.html 2) FontForge now supports python scripting. The (fontforge) python modules are described at http://fontforge.sf.net/python.html this is not well tested, because I'm not very familiar with python. Not all of the executables have been build with python (because I didn't know what the "standard" python version might be for that system or because I did not want to force people to download python in order to use fontforge. Tipard Video Converter Ultimate 10.3.6 Crack + Registration Key 2021 would like to thank Apostolos Syropoulos, Lee Chenhwa, Michal Nowakowski, Philipp Poll, and Pierre Hanser for providing translations.
On Wed, 2007-03-14 at 19:01, George Williams wrote: > Font Editor Archives s Tue, Font Editor Archives s, 2007-03-13 at 07:40, George Williams wrote: > > Sometime later this week I hope to post an experimental build containing > > a major rewrite of the UI, Font Editor Archives s. > I had hoped that I would have time to finish rewriting the The metrics view has changed considerably. It displays all the features in the font, and allows you to select which ones you want active in the view. It lets you set the script & language, Font Editor Archives s. It will apply lookups that it couldn't handle previously like ligatures and contextuals. It does not do Indic glyph reordering. I'm not sure how to and last I checked MS had not updated their docs to reflect their new procedures.
On Tue, 2007-03-13 at 07:40, George Williams wrote: > Sometime later this week I hope to post an experimental build containing > a major rewrite of the UI. I had hoped that I would have time to finish rewriting the documentation, but it appears that is not to be. (I go on vacation tomorrow to run a marathon). Instead I shall post an experimental source tarball into the file release system (in the 12-March release), update the cvs tree, and write a few words here about the differences. The major change is that fontforge now presents lookups to the user rather than features, Font Editor Archives s. I think this makes simple things more difficult (which is why I avoided this when I started), Font Editor Archives s, but it makes complex things possible. Sadly the world is not simple. So when a piece of typographic information is created (a ligature, a kern pair, a glyph substitution, etc.) it must be tagged with a lookup (actually a lookup sub-table) rather than a Font Editor Archives s tag, Font Editor Archives s. The lookup itself will be tagged with a feature tag (possibly several tags) and with scripts and languages in which that lookup should be active. NOTE: This reverses the way GPOS/GSUB think about things, Font Editor Archives s, but it contains the same information, Font Editor Archives s. The Font Info dialog now contains a Lookup pane which allows you to create and edit lookups and their subtables, Font Editor Archives s. You can also reorder them. The order shown in the dialog is the order in which they will be applied. A mac feature/setting subtable also gets converted into this format. The Font Info dialog no longer has Anchor Classes, Contextual, Font Editor Archives s, or State Machine panes, Font Editor Archives s. Instead you can edit a lookup subtable's data. There are new dialogs which list all Font Editor Archives s information for each lookup type (ie. a dialog which lists all kern pairs in a subtable), and these provide access to the old anchor class, contextual or state machine dialogs. The Glyph Info command has also changed. It looks simpler and more comprehensible (I think), but the act of creating a new substitution has become more complex because (potentially) one must create a new lookup and lookup subtable before doing the simple task of adding a new replacement glyph. The kerning class, contextual and state machine dialogs have all changed in that they no longer request a feature tag, they now need a lookup subtable, Font Editor Archives s. The metrics view also needs a subtable. And so do many other dialogs. Show ATT has changed, but it is still not editable. I hope that the Lookups pane will do that instead, Font Editor Archives s. There used to be a scripting command which indicated what ligature features got stored in afm files. Now each ligature lookup has a flag set on it which conveys this information. The Element->Typographic Features menu has been removed. It's functionality has moved into Font Info->Lookups (I hope I've got everything). Some scripting commands have been removed, Font Editor Archives s, others have been changed and others have been added. I apologize for this, Font Editor Archives s, as it will break existing scripts, but some basic concepts no longer exist and others, very different, have replaced them. Removed: DefaultATT ControlAfmLigatureOutput ApplySubstitutions CopyGlyphFeatures AddATT Replaced with Font Editor Archives s RemoveATT GlyphInfo(Position/Pair/Substitution/AltSubs/MultSubs/Ligature) SelectByATT Replaced with SelectByPosSub Changed Set(V)Kern takes an optional third argument, a lookup subtable name (if not specified it choses one) AddAnchorClass(name,type,lookup-subtable-name) GetPosSub(subtable-name) AutoKern(spacing,threshold,subtable-name[,kernfile]) Added AddLookup(name,type,flags,feature-script-lang-array[,after-lookup-name]) n*[feature-tag,script-lang-array] n*[script-tag,lang-array] n*[lang] GetLookupInfo(lookup-name) => [type,flags,feature-script-lang-array] AddLookupSubtable(lookup-name,subtable-name[,after-subtable-name]) GetLookupOfSubtable(subtable-name) GetSubtableOfAnchorClass(anchor-class-name) AddPosSub(subtable-name,variant(s)) (subtable-name,dx,dy,dadv_x,dadv_y) (subtable-name,other-glyph-name,dx,dy.) RemoveLookupSubtable(subtable-name) RemoveLookup(lookup-name) MergeLookupSubtables(subtable-name1,subtable-name2) MergeLookups(lookup-name1,lookup-name2) SelectByPosSub(subtable-name,search_type) GetLookups("GPOS"/"GSUB") GetLookupSubtables(lookup-name) LookupStoreLigatureInAfm(lookup-name,store-it) LookupSetFeatureList(lookup-name,feature-script-lang-array) The sfd format has changed. New files are tagged as version 2. Old files will still work, Font Editor Archives s, but ff will Font Editor Archives s longer produce file in the old format. I'm not aware of any bugs. :-)

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Re: ?: double-byte font editor for Mac

From: Richard S. Cook ([email protected])
Date: Sat Jul 19 1997 - 08:52:53 EDT

Hi all, Font Editor Archives s.
Re the results of my previous queries. It seems that there is a PowerPC
native double-byte TT font editor included in the Hong Kong/Taiwan
localized release of the Mac OS (7.6T), Font Editor Archives s. This application *will not* run on
68k machines.

I have as yet not been able to test it (on a PPC), nor do I know how it
will function with versions of the CLK other than v.1.3 (see below), and
so my next questions:

Can someone who *has* used it please give a description of what it can do?
Can it be used, Font Editor Archives s, by whatever workaround, to modify/create an entire font?
Does it allow the user to assign new chars. to empty codepoints, and if
so, how many (is there an upper limit to the number of Chinese chars.),
and how is wordprocessing input of such new chars, Font Editor Archives s. handled?

Can anyone recommend a US vendor selling the Hong Kong/Taiwan localized
release of the Mac OS (7.6T) CD Package?

>> "TrueType Font Editor" from:
>> Apple Asia Chinese Language Kits (AACLK) Version 1.3.
>> (A.k.a. Mac OS 7.6T CD Package. T=Traditional Chinese.
>> The Package can install both CLK only or the full Chinese System.)
>> This AACLK 1.3 was only available in Taiwan, HongKong.

_____________________________
Richard S, Font Editor Archives s. Cook, Jr.
Somerville, MA USA 02144
email: [email protected]
http://world.std.com/~rscook/
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>*<<<<<<<<<<<<<<



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So I'm trying to make some test prints of my font from the Print dialog, using both the text display and the full font display. problems: In the text display output, the second page shows up as a totally different font, Font Editor Archives s. Also I can't seem to change the point size. With the full font display, most of the basic accented characters will not show up correctly. (rows 00C0 through Font Editor Archives s I've attached a font and its sample output PDFs to show what's happening. Using the November build for Mac OS X 10.4 ppc. -- -- Jason Pagura [email protected]
Hi, the attachment includes an .sfd source and a generated TTF font, Font Editor Archives s, illustrating the issues in the message "A few notes on generated TTF fonts" sent to the fontforge-devel list. Thanks, Maurizio M. Gavioli -- Maurizio M. Gavioli - VistaMare Software via San Bernardo 5, I-16030 Pieve Ligure, ITALY http://www.vistamaresoft.com/
Run and then see germandbls. If you then try pasting the AddInstrs statement for germandbls into the scripting window, it works fine.
Also sprach George Williams: > > [email protected]:/ph/2007/manual/philips$ fontforge 5.pfa > > Copyright (c) 2000-2005 by George Williams. > > Executable based on sources from 12:08 5-Dec-2005. > > Segmentation fault > >=20 > > I'm running this on Ubuntu 5.04. Pfa-file is attached. > Ok: > 1) The font file you sent contains many separate fonts > 2) Despite claims to the contrary there are no type1 fonts here > (the first font is a type42 font and ff can read it if you rem= ove > the others) > 3) The first font is followed by some code including the operator > pdfMakeFont. This is not listed in the PLRM as a valid operato= r > and is not defined in the file. >=20 > So, it's not a valid font file. It's not even valid PostScript. If y= ou > strip out the extraneous stuff ff works. Thanks for checking. The pfa file was generated by a script I found someplace -- attached for references -- but it's obviously not doint it= s job. Cheers, -h&kon H=E5kon Wium Lie 1-Click-Quotes/Stock Watch 1.0.0 crack serial keygen [email protected] http://www.princexml.com/how= come
¤³¤Î¥á¡¼¥ë¤Ï²¼µ­»ö¶È¼Ô¡¦Á÷¿®¼Ô¤¬Á÷¿®¤·¤Æ¤ª¤ê¤Þ¤¹¡£ ------------------------------------------------------------ ¡¡<»ö¶È¼Ô><Á÷¿®¼Ô> ̾¾Î¡§¥Þ¥ê¡¼¥í¡¼¥º ½»½ê¡§ÅìµþÅÔÌܹõ¶èÃæ±ûÄ®1-18-13-203 ------------------------------------------------------------ ÆÃÄ꾦¼è°úË¡»Ü¹Ôµ¬Â§¡¡¼õ¤±¼è¤ê¤ò´õ˾¤·¤Ê¤¤¾ì¹ç¤ÎÏ¢ÍíÊýË¡ ´Ø·¸¤Î¤Ê¤¤Êý¤ËÆϤ­¤Þ¤·¤¿¾ì¹ç¤ªÏͤӿ½¤·¾å¤²¤Þ¤¹¡£º£¸å°ìÀÚ¤ÎÇÛ¿®¤ò µñÈݤ¹¤ë¾ì¹ç¤Ï¤ª¼ê¿ô¤Ç¤¹¤¬¡¢²¼µ­URL¤Î¥¯¥ê¥Ã¥¯¤·¤Æ¤¯¤À¤µ¤¤¡£ http://www.qmsys.net/r.php?id=1&sid=c0cfe017acfe9e32f0638cc62aa22c92 ¾åµ­URL¤Î¥¯¥ê¥Ã¥¯½èÍý¤Ç¥¨¥é¡¼¤¬µ¯¤³¤Ã¤¿¾ì¹ç¤Ï¡¢¤ª¼ê¿ô¤Ç¤¹¤¬¡¢ ²¼µ­¤Î¥¢¥É¥ì¥¹¤Ë¡Ö¼õ¿®µñÈݡפηï̾¤ÇÁ÷¿®¤·¤Æ¤¯¤À¤µ¤¤¡£ [email protected] ------------------------------------------------------------ ¡ù¥Ç¡¼¥¿¡¼ÆþÎÏ£±£°£°£°Ëü·ïϢ³Æþ²Ù(£²£°£°Ì¾ÂçÊ罸¡ª)¡ù ¨®¢¢¢£¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¢£¢¢¨¯ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¥á¥ë¥Þ¥¬¥á¥ë¥â¡¦¥Ë¥å¡¼¥¹¡¡¡¡ ¡ã2004.08ȯ¹Ô¡ä Jogos de Aventura de Graça para Baixar ¨±¢¢¢£¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¢£¢¢¨° ¡Ú¢­¥ª¥¹¥¹¥á¾ðÊó/¥Ó¥¸¥Í¥¹¡Û¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬1,921,762Éôȯ¹Ô¨¬¡ù Font Editor Archives s ¥ì¨­¥Ù¨­¥ë¨­¥Á¨­¥§¨­¥Ã¨­¥¯¨­¤Ê¨­¤·¨­¤Ç¨­Â¨¨­»Å¨­»ö¨­ ¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨° ¡¡ ¨² ɬ¤º²Ô¤²¤ëºßÂð¥ï¡¼¥¯¤ÎÊ罸¤Ç¤¹¡£ ¨² ǯÎð¤Ï£²£°ºÐ¡Á£¶£³ºÐ¤Þ¤Ç¡£ ¨² ¥Ç¡¼¥¿ÆþÎϤòÂçÎÌÆþ²Ù¤·¤Þ¤·¤¿¡£ ¨² £¶Ç¯´Ö¤Ï°Â¿´Êݾã¤Ç»Å»ö¤¬½Ð¤»¤Þ¤¹¡£ ¨±¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¢ª¡¡http://www.career-assist.co.jp/http://www.career-assist.co.jp/¡¡¡þ ---------------------------------------------------------------------- ¢¨»ñÎÁÀÁµá¼ê½ç¡¡ ---------------------------------------------------------------------- ¡ã»ñÎÁÀÁµá¼ê½ç¡ä £±¡¥ ¡Øhttp://www.career-assist.co.jp/¡Ù¤Ø¥¢¥¯¥»¥¹¤¹¤ë¡£ £²¡¥ ¡Ø¥È¥Ã¥×²èÌÌ¡Ù¢ª¡Ø»ñÎÁÀÁµá¡Ù £³¡¥ ¥Õ¥©¡¼¥à¤Ë¤·¤¿¤¬¤Ã¤ÆɬÍ×»ö¹à¤òÆþÎϤ¹¤ë¡£ £´¡¥ ¥á¡¼¥ë¥¢¥É¥ì¥¹¤Ï¤ª´Ö°ã¤¨¤Î¤Ê¤¤¤è¤¦¤ËÆþÎϤ·¤Æ¤¯¤À¤µ¤¤¡£ £µ¡¥¡¡É¬Í×»ö¹à¤ò¤¹¤Ù¤ÆÆþÎϤ·¡¢¡ØÁ÷¿®¡Ù¤ò¥¯¥ê¥Ã¥¯¡£ ¡¡ - ¥á¥ë¥Þ¥¬¥á¥ë¥â¡¦¥Ë¥å¡¼¥¹¤Ë¤Ä¤¤¤Æ ----------------------------------- ·ÇºÜÆâÍƤˤĤ¤¤Æ¤Î¾ÜºÙ¡¢¾¦ÉÊ¡¦¥µ¡¼¥Ó¥¹¤Ë¤Ä¤¤¤Æ¤Ï¡¢(³ô)¥Þ¥ê¡¼¥í¡¼¥º¤Ç ¤Ï¤ªÅú¤¨¤¹¤ë¤³¤È¤¬¤Ç¤­¤Þ¤»¤ó¡£¥á¡¼¥ëÃæ¤Ç¤´°ÆÆ⤷¤Æ¤¤¤ë³Æ´ë¶È¤Î¤ªÌ䤤¹ç ¤ï¤»Áë¸ý¤ò¤´³Îǧ¤¯¤À¤µ¤¤¡£ ¤Þ¤¿¡¢HTML·Á¼°¤Ç¤ªÁ÷¤ê¤¹¤ë¥á¡¼¥ë¤Ë¤Ï¡¢¥¦¥§¥Ã¥Ö¥Ó¡¼¥³¥ó¤¬»ÈÍѤµ¤ì¤Æ¤¤¤Þ ¤¹¡£¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡
hello I'v found 2 typos in nomen-en.c diff nomen-en.c* 2626c2626 < static char *str_ProbMultiName = "The this glyph has the same name as the glyph at encoding"; --- > static char *str_ProbMultiName = "This glyph has the same name as the glyph at encoding"; 2753c2753 < static char *str_MultipleUnicodePopup = "Check for muliple characters which use the same unicode code point\nOnly one glyph at a time (the one to be encoded) should have a given\nunicode code point"; --- > static char *str_MultipleUnicodePopup = "Check for multiple characters which use the same unicode code point\nOnly one glyph at a time (the one to be encoded) should have a given\nunicode code point"; there is also a new french translation, enriched + corrected for kashidé -- Pierre

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So I'm trying to make some test prints of my font from the Print dialog, using both the text display and the full font display. problems: In the text display output, the second page shows up as a totally different font. Also I can't seem to change the point size. With the full font display, most of the basic accented characters will not show up correctly. (rows 00C0 through 00F0) I've attached a font and its sample output PDFs to show what's happening. Using the November build for Mac OS X 10.4 ppc. -- -- Jason Pagura [email protected]
Hi, the attachment includes an .sfd source and a generated TTF font, illustrating the issues in the message "A few notes on generated TTF fonts" sent to the fontforge-devel list. Thanks, Maurizio M. Gavioli -- Maurizio M. Gavioli - VistaMare Software via San Bernardo 5, I-16030 Pieve Ligure, ITALY http://www.vistamaresoft.com/
Run and then see germandbls. If you then try pasting the AddInstrs statement for germandbls into the scripting window, it works fine.
Also sprach George Williams: > > [email protected]:/ph/2007/manual/philips$ fontforge 5.pfa > > Copyright (c) 2000-2005 by George Williams. > > Executable based on sources from 12:08 5-Dec-2005. > > Segmentation fault > >=20 > > I'm running this on Ubuntu 5.04. Pfa-file is attached. > Ok: > 1) The font file you sent contains many separate fonts > 2) Despite claims to the contrary there are no type1 fonts here > (the first font is a type42 font and ff can read it if you rem= ove > the others) > 3) The first font is followed by some code including the operator > pdfMakeFont. This is not listed in the PLRM as a valid operato= r > and is not defined in the file. >=20 > So, it's not a valid font file. It's not even valid PostScript. If y= ou > strip out the extraneous stuff ff works. Thanks for checking. The pfa file was generated by a script I found someplace -- attached for references -- but it's obviously not doint it= s job. Cheers, -h&kon H=E5kon Wium Lie [email protected] http://www.princexml.com/how= come
¤³¤Î¥á¡¼¥ë¤Ï²¼µ­»ö¶È¼Ô¡¦Á÷¿®¼Ô¤¬Á÷¿®¤·¤Æ¤ª¤ê¤Þ¤¹¡£ ------------------------------------------------------------ ¡¡<»ö¶È¼Ô><Á÷¿®¼Ô> ̾¾Î¡§¥Þ¥ê¡¼¥í¡¼¥º ½»½ê¡§ÅìµþÅÔÌܹõ¶èÃæ±ûÄ®1-18-13-203 ------------------------------------------------------------ ÆÃÄ꾦¼è°úË¡»Ü¹Ôµ¬Â§¡¡¼õ¤±¼è¤ê¤ò´õ˾¤·¤Ê¤¤¾ì¹ç¤ÎÏ¢ÍíÊýË¡ ´Ø·¸¤Î¤Ê¤¤Êý¤ËÆϤ­¤Þ¤·¤¿¾ì¹ç¤ªÏͤӿ½¤·¾å¤²¤Þ¤¹¡£º£¸å°ìÀÚ¤ÎÇÛ¿®¤ò µñÈݤ¹¤ë¾ì¹ç¤Ï¤ª¼ê¿ô¤Ç¤¹¤¬¡¢²¼µ­URL¤Î¥¯¥ê¥Ã¥¯¤·¤Æ¤¯¤À¤µ¤¤¡£ http://www.qmsys.net/r.php?id=1&sid=c0cfe017acfe9e32f0638cc62aa22c92 ¾åµ­URL¤Î¥¯¥ê¥Ã¥¯½èÍý¤Ç¥¨¥é¡¼¤¬µ¯¤³¤Ã¤¿¾ì¹ç¤Ï¡¢¤ª¼ê¿ô¤Ç¤¹¤¬¡¢ ²¼µ­¤Î¥¢¥É¥ì¥¹¤Ë¡Ö¼õ¿®µñÈݡפηï̾¤ÇÁ÷¿®¤·¤Æ¤¯¤À¤µ¤¤¡£ [email protected] ------------------------------------------------------------ ¡ù¥Ç¡¼¥¿¡¼ÆþÎÏ£±£°£°£°Ëü·ïϢ³Æþ²Ù(£²£°£°Ì¾ÂçÊ罸¡ª)¡ù ¨®¢¢¢£¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¢£¢¢¨¯ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¥á¥ë¥Þ¥¬¥á¥ë¥â¡¦¥Ë¥å¡¼¥¹¡¡¡¡ ¡ã2004.08ȯ¹Ô¡ä ¨±¢¢¢£¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¢£¢¢¨° ¡Ú¢­¥ª¥¹¥¹¥á¾ðÊó/¥Ó¥¸¥Í¥¹¡Û¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬1,921,762Éôȯ¹Ô¨¬¡ù ¥ì¨­¥Ù¨­¥ë¨­¥Á¨­¥§¨­¥Ã¨­¥¯¨­¤Ê¨­¤·¨­¤Ç¨­Â¨¨­»Å¨­»ö¨­ ¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨°¨¬¨° ¡¡ ¨² ɬ¤º²Ô¤²¤ëºßÂð¥ï¡¼¥¯¤ÎÊ罸¤Ç¤¹¡£ ¨² ǯÎð¤Ï£²£°ºÐ¡Á£¶£³ºÐ¤Þ¤Ç¡£ ¨² ¥Ç¡¼¥¿ÆþÎϤòÂçÎÌÆþ²Ù¤·¤Þ¤·¤¿¡£ ¨² £¶Ç¯´Ö¤Ï°Â¿´Êݾã¤Ç»Å»ö¤¬½Ð¤»¤Þ¤¹¡£ ¨±¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¨¬¢ª¡¡http://www.career-assist.co.jp/http://www.career-assist.co.jp/¡¡¡þ ---------------------------------------------------------------------- ¢¨»ñÎÁÀÁµá¼ê½ç¡¡ ---------------------------------------------------------------------- ¡ã»ñÎÁÀÁµá¼ê½ç¡ä £±¡¥ ¡Øhttp://www.career-assist.co.jp/¡Ù¤Ø¥¢¥¯¥»¥¹¤¹¤ë¡£ £²¡¥ ¡Ø¥È¥Ã¥×²èÌÌ¡Ù¢ª¡Ø»ñÎÁÀÁµá¡Ù £³¡¥ ¥Õ¥©¡¼¥à¤Ë¤·¤¿¤¬¤Ã¤ÆɬÍ×»ö¹à¤òÆþÎϤ¹¤ë¡£ £´¡¥ ¥á¡¼¥ë¥¢¥É¥ì¥¹¤Ï¤ª´Ö°ã¤¨¤Î¤Ê¤¤¤è¤¦¤ËÆþÎϤ·¤Æ¤¯¤À¤µ¤¤¡£ £µ¡¥¡¡É¬Í×»ö¹à¤ò¤¹¤Ù¤ÆÆþÎϤ·¡¢¡ØÁ÷¿®¡Ù¤ò¥¯¥ê¥Ã¥¯¡£ ¡¡ - ¥á¥ë¥Þ¥¬¥á¥ë¥â¡¦¥Ë¥å¡¼¥¹¤Ë¤Ä¤¤¤Æ ----------------------------------- ·ÇºÜÆâÍƤˤĤ¤¤Æ¤Î¾ÜºÙ¡¢¾¦ÉÊ¡¦¥µ¡¼¥Ó¥¹¤Ë¤Ä¤¤¤Æ¤Ï¡¢(³ô)¥Þ¥ê¡¼¥í¡¼¥º¤Ç ¤Ï¤ªÅú¤¨¤¹¤ë¤³¤È¤¬¤Ç¤­¤Þ¤»¤ó¡£¥á¡¼¥ëÃæ¤Ç¤´°ÆÆ⤷¤Æ¤¤¤ë³Æ´ë¶È¤Î¤ªÌ䤤¹ç ¤ï¤»Áë¸ý¤ò¤´³Îǧ¤¯¤À¤µ¤¤¡£ ¤Þ¤¿¡¢HTML·Á¼°¤Ç¤ªÁ÷¤ê¤¹¤ë¥á¡¼¥ë¤Ë¤Ï¡¢¥¦¥§¥Ã¥Ö¥Ó¡¼¥³¥ó¤¬»ÈÍѤµ¤ì¤Æ¤¤¤Þ ¤¹¡£¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡
hello I'v found 2 typos in nomen-en.c diff nomen-en.c* 2626c2626 < static char *str_ProbMultiName = "The this glyph has the same name as the glyph at encoding"; --- > static char *str_ProbMultiName = "This glyph has the same name as the glyph at encoding"; 2753c2753 < static char *str_MultipleUnicodePopup = "Check for muliple characters which use the same unicode code point\nOnly one glyph at a time (the one to be encoded) should have a given\nunicode code point"; --- > static char *str_MultipleUnicodePopup = "Check for multiple characters which use the same unicode code point\nOnly one glyph at a time (the one to be encoded) should have a given\nunicode code point"; there is also a new french translation, enriched + corrected for kashidé -- Pierre

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FontForge

Font editor created by George Williams

FontForge is a FOSSfont editor which supports many common font formats. Developed primarily by George Williams until 2012, FontForge is free software and is distributed under a mix of the GNU General Public License Version 3 and the 3-clause BSD license.[2] It is available for operating systems including Linux, Windows[3] and macOS[4] and is localized into 12 languages.

Features[edit]

To facilitate automated format conversion and other repetitive tasks, FontForge implements two scripting languages: its own language and Python.[5] FontForge can run scripts from its GUI, from the command line, and also offers its features as a Python module so it can be integrated into any Python program.[6]

FontForge supports Adobe's OpenType feature file specification (with its own extensions to the syntax).[7] It also supports the unofficial Microsoft mathematical typesetting extensions ( table)[8] introduced for Cambria Math and supported by Office 2007, XeTeX and LuaTeX. At least one free OpenType mathematical font has been developed in FontForge.

FontForge uses FreeType for rendering fonts on screen.[9] Since the November 15, 2008 release, FontForge uses libcairo and libpango software libraries for graphics and text rendering[10] providing anti-aliased graphics and complex text layout support.

FontForge can use Potrace or AutoTrace to auto trace bitmap images and import them into a font.

Parts of FontForge code are used by the LuaTeX typesetting engine for reading and parsing OpenType fonts.[11]

The FontForge source code includes a number of utility programs, including 'showttf' which shows the contents of binary font files, and a WOFF converter and deconverter.

Supported formats[edit]

FontForge supports a wide variety of font formats.[12] Its native Spline Font Database format ( file name extension) is text-based[13] and facilitates collaboration between designers, as difference files can be easily created. FontForge also supports the interoperable UFO source format, which is based on XML.

The software supports many other font formats and converts fonts from one format to another. Supported font formats include: TrueType (TTF), TrueType Collection (TTC), OpenType (OTF), PostScript Type 1, TeX Bitmap Fonts, X11 OTB bitmap (only sfnt), Glyph Bitmap Distribution Format (BDF), FON (Windows), FNT (Windows), and Web Open Font Format (WOFF). FontForge also imports and exports fonts to and from the Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format and the Unified Font Object (UFO) format.

Development history[edit]

The FontForge project was founded by George Williams as a retirement project, and initially published from 2001 to March 2004 as PfaEdit).[14][15]

Williams actively developed, maintained and supported the program and related utilities for around 12 years. In mid-2011, Dave Crossland began contributing to the project and the project moved from SourceForge to GitHub. Crossland began offering introductory type design workshops through the TeX Users Group (TUG) to raise funds to hire contract developers to maintain and develop the program. FontForge's development became more active, and Khaled Hosny and Barry Schwartz were notable contributors, but in late 2012 they and Crossland disagreed about the direction of the project so they forked FontForge as SortsMill Tools.[16]

In 2011, FontForge was packaged for easier installation on Mac OS X by Dr. Ben Martin with support from TUG. Meanwhile, Matthew Petroff published his Windows Build System and unofficial Windows builds. In 2013 the FontForgeBuilds project was started on SourceForge to extend this; it was subsequently entirely rewritten, and is today maintained by Jeremy Tan as a Windows application.

In 2012, Crossland organized a new project website to be hosted on GitHub Pages, fontforge.github.io, and used funds raised from teaching FontForge to beginners to hire a contract web designer. With his support Martin added a real time collaboration feature that was presented by them both as a keynote at the Libre Graphics Meeting 2013 in Madrid.

In 2014, with financial support from Google, Frank Trampe added full support for the UFO font source format.

Fonts developed with FontForge[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Releases · fontforge/fontforge · GitHub". GitHub. frank-trampe. Retrieved 2020-04-17.
  2. ^fontforge (8 October 2021). "fontforge/LICENSE at master · fontforge/fontforge · GitHub". GitHub.
  3. ^Gurdy Leete; Mary Leete (12 June 2007). Microsoft Expression Blend Bible. John Wiley & Sons. p. 295. ISBN . Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  4. ^James, Daniel (2009-12-04). Crafting Digital Media: Audacity, Blender, Drupal, GIMP, Scribus, and other Open Source Tools (1 ed.). Berkeley, CA: Apress. p. 114. ISBN .
  5. ^"Writing scripts to change fonts in FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  6. ^"Writing python scripts to change fonts in FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  7. ^"FontForge's implementation of Adobe's Feature File syntax". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  8. ^"MATH typesetting information". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. 2007-08-04. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  9. ^"Building FontForge from source". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  10. ^"Change log for FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  11. ^"LuaTeX — Taco Hoekwater, July 24, TUG 2008"(PDF). Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  12. ^Lunde, Ken (2009-01-13). CJKV Information Processing. Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly. p. 447. ISBN .
  13. ^"Spline Font Database File Format". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  14. ^Yannis Haralambous (3 October 2007). Fonts & Encodings (1 ed.). O'Reilly Media, Inc. pp. 444, 988. ISBN . Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  15. ^"The history of the development of FontForge". Fontforge.sourceforge.net. Archived from the original on 2009-04-23. Retrieved 2009-11-09.
  16. ^"SortMill Tools". Barry Schwartz. Retrieved 2015-02-27.
  17. ^"OSP-foundry» Blog Archive » Sans Guilt".
  18. ^"OSP (Open Source Publishing) →". osp.kitchen.

External links[edit]

Media related to Fontforge at Wikimedia Commons

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Fonts

Part I Chapter 6

Written by Zach Leatherman

Reviewed by John Teague and Aymen Loukil

Analyzed by TJ Monserrat and Rick Viscomi

Edited by Barry Pollard

Introduction

Web fonts enable beautiful and functional typography on the web. Using web fonts not only empowers design, but it democratizes a subset of design, as it allows easier access to those who might not have particularly strong design skills. However, for all the good they can do, web fonts can also do great harm to your site’s performance if they are not loaded properly.

Are they a net positive for the web? Do they provide more benefit than harm? Are the web standards cowpaths sufficiently paved to encourage web font loading best practices by default? And if not, what needs to change? Let’s take a data-driven peek at whether or not we can answer those questions by inspecting how web fonts are used on the web today.

Where did you get those web fonts?

The first and most prominent question: performance. There is a whole chapter dedicated to performance but we will delve a little into font-specific performance issues here.

Using hosted web fonts enables ease of implementation and maintenance, but self-hosting offers the best performance. Given that web fonts by default make text invisible while the web font is loading (also known as the Flash of Invisible Text, or FOIT), the performance of web fonts can be more critical than non-blocking assets like images.

Are fonts being hosted on the same host or by a different host?

Differentiating self-hosting against third-party hosting is increasingly relevant in an HTTP/2 world, where the performance gap between a same-host and different-host connection can be wider. Same-host requests have the huge benefit of a better potential for prioritization against other same-host requests in the waterfall.

Recommendations to mitigate the performance costs of loading web fonts from another host include using the , , and resource hints, but high priority web fonts should be same-host requests to minimize the performance impact of web fonts. This is especially important for fonts used by very visually prominent content or body copy occupying the majority of a page.

Popular web font hosting strategies.

Bar chart showing the popularity of third-party and self-hosting strategies for web fonts. 75% of mobile web pages use third-party hosts and 25% self-host. Desktop websites have similar usage.

The fact that three quarters are hosted is perhaps unsurprising given Google Fonts dominance that we will discuss below.

Google serves fonts using third-party CSS files hosted on . Developers add requests to these stylesheets using tags in their markup. While these stylesheets are render blocking, they are very small. However, the font files are hosted on yet another domain, . The model of requiring two separate hops to two different domains makes a great option here for the second request that will not be discovered until the CSS is downloaded.

Note that while would be a nice addition to load the font files higher in the request waterfall (remember that sets up the connection, it doesn’t request the file content), is not yet available with Google Fonts. Google Fonts generates unique URLs for their font files which are subject to change.

What are the most popular third-party hosts?

HostDesktopMobile
fonts.gstatic.com75.4%74.9%
use.typekit.net7.2%6.6%
maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com1.8%2.0%
use.fontawesome.com1.1%1.2%
static.parastorage.com0.8%1.2%
fonts.shopifycdn.com0.6%0.6%
cdn.shopify.com0.5%0.5%
cdnjs.cloudflare.com0.4%0.5%
use.typekit.com0.4%0.4%
netdna.bootstrapcdn.com0.3%0.4%
fast.fonts.net0.3%0.3%
static.dealer.com0.2%0.2%
themes.googleusercontent.com0.2%0.2%
static-v.tawk.to0.1%0.3%
stc.utdstc.com0.1%0.2%
cdn.jsdelivr.net0.2%0.2%
kit-free.fontawesome.com0.2%0.2%
open.scdn.co0.1%0.1%
assets.squarespace.com0.1%0.1%
fonts.jimstatic.com0.1%0.2%

The dominance of Google Fonts here was simultaneously surprising and unsurprising at the same time. It was unsurprising in that I expected the service to be the most popular and surprising in the sheer dominance of its popularity. 75% of font requests is astounding. TypeKit was a distant single-digit second place, with the Bootstrap library accounting for an even more distant third place.

While the high usage of Google Fonts here is very impressive, it is also noteworthy that only 29% of pages included a Google Fonts element. This could mean a few things:

  • When pages uses Google Fonts, they use a lot of Google Fonts. They are provided without monetary cost, after all. Perhaps they’re being used in a popular WYSIWYG editor? This seems like a very likely explanation.
  • Or a more unlikely story is that it could mean that a lot of people are using Google Fonts with instead of .
  • Or if we want to go off the deep end into super unlikely scenarios, it could mean that many people are using Google Fonts with an HTTP header instead.

Google Fonts documentation encourages the for the Google Fonts CSS to be placed as the first child in the of a page. This is a big ask! In practice, this is not common as only half a percent of all pages (about 20,000 pages) took this advice.

More so, if a page is using or as elements, these would come before the Google Fonts CSS anyway. Read on for more about these resource hints.

Speeding up third-party hosting

As mentioned above, a super easy way to speed up web font requests to a third-party host is to use the resource hint.

Wow! Less than 2% of pages are using ! Given that Google Fonts is at 75%, this should be higher! Developers: if you use Google Fonts, use ! Google Fonts: proselytize more!

In fact, if you’re using Google Fonts go ahead and add this to your if it’s not there already:

Most popular typefaces

RankFont familyDesktopMobile
1Open Sans24%22%
2Roboto15%19%
3Montserrat5%4%
4Source Sans Pro4%3%
5Noto Sans JP3%3%
6Lato3%3%
7Nanum Gothic4%2%
8Noto Sans KR3%2%
9Roboto Condensed2%2%
10Raleway2%2%
11FontAwesome1%1%
12Roboto Slab1%1%
13Noto Sans TC1%1%
14Poppins1%1%
15Ubuntu1%1%
16Oswald1%1%
17Merriweather1%1%
18PT Sans1%1%
19Playfair Display1%1%
20Noto Sans1%1%

It is unsurprising that the top entries here seem to match up very similarly to Google Fonts’ list of fonts sorted by popularity.

What font formats are being used?

WOFF2 is pretty well supported in web browsers today. Google Fonts serves WOFF2, a format that offers improved compression over its predecessor WOFF, which was itself already an improvement over other existing font formats.

Popularity of web font MIME types.

Bar chart showing the popularity of web font MIME types. WOFF2 is used on 74% of fonts, followed by 13% WOFF, 6% octet-stream, 3% TTF, 2% plain, 1% HTML, 1% SFNT, and fewer than 1% for all other types. Desktop and mobile have similar distributions.

From my perspective, an argument could be made to go WOFF2-only for web fonts after seeing the results here. I wonder where the double-digit WOFF usage is coming from? Perhaps developers still serving web fonts to Internet Explorer?

Third place (and a little further down) would seem to suggest that a lot of web servers are configured improperly, sending an incorrect MIME type with web font file requests.

Let’s dig a bit deeper and look at the values used in the property of declarations:

Popularity of font formats in @font-face declarations.

Bar chart showing the popularity of formats used in font-face declarations. 69% of desktop pages’ @font-face declarations specify the WOFF2 format, 11% WOFF, 10% TrueType, 8% SVG, 2% EOT, and fewer than 1% OpenType, TTF, and OTF. The distribution for mobile pages is similar.

I was hoping to see SVG fonts on the decline. They’re buggy and implementations have been removed from every browser except Safari. Time to drop these, y’all.

The SVG data point here also makes me wonder what MIME type y’all are serving these SVG fonts with. I don’t see anywhere in Figure 6.7. Anyway, don’t worry about fixing that, just get rid of them!

WOFF2-only

RankFormat combinationsDesktopMobile
1woff284.0%81.9%
2svg, truetype, woff4.3%4.0%
3svg, truetype, woff, woff23.5%3.2%
4eot, svg, truetype, woff1.3%2.9%
5woff, woff21.8%1.8%
6eot, svg, truetype, woff, woff21.2%2.1%
7truetype, woff0.9%1.1%
8woff0.7%0.8%
9truetype0.6%0.7%
10truetype, woff, woff20.6%0.6%
11opentype, woff, woff20.3%0.2%
12svg0.2%0.2%
13eot, truetype, woff0.1%0.2%
14opentype, woff0.1%0.1%
15opentype0.1%0.1%
16eot0.1%0.1%
17opentype, svg, truetype, woff0.1%0.0%
18opentype, truetype, woff, woff20.0%0.0%
19eot, truetype, woff, woff20.0%0.0%
20svg, woff0.0%0.0%

This dataset seems to suggest that the majority of people are already using WOFF2-only in their blocks. But this is misleading of course, per our earlier discussion on the dominance of Google Fonts in the data set. Google Fonts does some sniffing methods to serve a streamlined CSS file and only includes the most modern . Unsurprisingly, WOFF2 dominates the results here for that reason, as browser support for WOFF2 has been pretty broad for some time now.

Importantly, this particular data doesn’t really support or detract from the case to go WOFF2-only yet, but it remains a tempting idea.

Fighting against invisible text

The number one tool we have to fight the default web font loading behavior of “invisible while loading” (also known as FOIT), is . Adding to your block is an easy way to tell the browser to show fallback text while the web font is loading.

Browser support is great too. Internet Explorer and pre-Chromium Edge don’t have support but they also render fallback text by default when a web font loads (no FOITs allowed here). For our Chrome tests, how commonly is used?

I assume this will be creeping up over time, especially now that Google Fonts is adding to all new code snippets copied from their site.

If you’re using Google Fonts, update your snippets! If you’re not using Google Fonts, use ! Read more about on MDN.

Let’s have a look at what values are popular:

Usage of font-display values.

Bar chart showing the usage of the font-display style. 2.6% of mobile pages set this style to , 1.5% to , 0.7% to , 0.4% to , 0.2% to optional, and 0.1% to enclosed in quotes, which is invalid. The desktop distribution is similar except usage is lower by 0.4 percentage points and usage is higher by 0.1 percentage points.

As an easy way to show fallback text while a web font is loading, reigns supreme and is the most common value. is also the default value used by new Google Fonts code snippets too. I would have expected (only render if cached) to have a bit more usage here as a few prominent developer evangelists lobbied for it a bit, but no dice.

How many web fonts are too many?

This is a question that requires some measure of nuance. How are the fonts being used? For how much content on the page? Where does this content live in the layout? How are the fonts being rendered? In lieu of nuance however let’s dive right into some broad and heavy handed analysis specifically centered on request counts.

Distribution of font requests per page.

Bar chart showing the distribution of font requests per page. The 10, 25, 50, 75, and 90th percentiles for desktop are: 0, 1, 3, 6, and 9 font requests. The distribution for mobile is identical until the 75th and 90th percentiles, where mobile pages request 1 fewer font.

The median web page makes three web font requests. At the 90th percentile, requested six and nine web fonts on mobile and desktop, respectively.

Histogram of web fonts requested per page.

Histogram showing the distribution of the number of font requests per page. The most popular number of font requests is 0 at 22% of desktop pages. The distribution drops to 9% of pages having 1 font, then crests at 10% for 2-4 fonts before falling as the number of fonts increases. The desktop and mobile distributions are similar, although the mobile distribution skews slightly toward having fewer fonts per page.

It does seem quite interesting that web font requests seem to be pretty steady across desktop and mobile. I’m glad to see the recommendation to hide blocks inside of a queries didn’t catch on (don’t get any ideas).

That said there are marginally more requests for fonts made on mobile devices. My hunch here is that fewer typefaces are available on mobile devices, which in turn means fewer hits in Google Fonts CSS, falling back to network requests for these.

You don’t want to win this award

The award for the page that requests the most web fonts goes to a site that made 718 web font requests!

After diving into the code, all of those 718 requests are going to Google Fonts! It looks like a malfunctioning “Above the Page fold” optimization plugin for WordPress has gone rogue on this site and is requesting (DDoS-ing?) all the Google Fonts—oops!

Ironic that a performance optimization plugin can make your performance much worse!

More accurate matching with

is a great CSS property to let the browser know specifically which code points the page would like to use in the font file. If the declaration has a , content on the page must match one of the code points in the range before the font is requested. It is a very good thing.

This is another metric that I expect was skewed by Google Fonts usage, as Google Fonts uses in most (if not all) of its CSS. I’d expect this to be less common in user land, but perhaps filtering out Google Fonts requests in the next edition of the Almanac may be possible.

Don’t request web fonts if a system font exists

is a nice way to reference a system font in your . If the font exists, it doesn’t need to make a request for a web font at all. This is used both extensively and controversially by Google Fonts, so it is likely another example of skewed data if we’re trying to glean patterns from user land.

It should also be noted here that it has been said by smarter people than I (Bram Stein of TypeKit) that using can be unpredictable as installed versions of fonts can be outdated and unreliable.

Condensed fonts and

Historically, has suffered from poor browser support and was not a well-known property. Read more about on MDN. But browser support has broadened.

It has been suggested that using condensed fonts on smaller viewports allows more text to be viewable, but this approach isn’t commonly used. That being said, that this property is used half a percentage point more on desktop than mobile is unexpected, and 7% seems much higher than I would have predicted.

Variable fonts are the future

Variable fonts allow several font weights and styles to be included in the one font file.

Even at 1.8% this was higher than expected, although I am excited to see this take off. Google Fonts v2 does include some support for variable fonts.

Usage of font-variation-settings axes.

Bar chart showing the usage of the font-variation-settings property. 42% of properties on desktop pages are set to the value, 32% to , 16% to , 2% or fewer to , , , , and more. The most notable differences between desktop and mobile pages are 26% usage of , 38% of , and 23% of .

Through the lens of this large data set, these are very low sample sizes-take these results with a grain of salt. However, as the most common axis on desktop pages is notable, with and trailing. In my experience, the introductory demos for variable fonts are usually weight-based.

Color fonts might also be the future?

Usage here of these is basically nonexistent but you can check out the excellent resource Color Fonts! WTF? for more information. Similar (but not at all) to the SVG format for fonts (which is bad and going away), this allows you to embed SVG inside of OpenType files, which is awesome and cool.

Conclusion

The biggest takeaway here is that Google Fonts dominates the web font discussion. Approaches they’ve taken weigh heavily on the data we’ve recorded here. The positives here are easy access to web fonts, good font formats (WOFF2), and for-free configurations. The downsides here are performance drawbacks associated with third-party hosting, different-host requests, and no access to .

I fully expect that in the future we’ll see the “Rise of the Variable Font”. This should be paired with a decline in web font requests, as Variable Fonts combine multiple individual font files into a single composite font file. But history has shown us that what usually happens here is that we optimize a thing and then add more things to fill the vacancy.

It will be very interesting to see if color fonts increase in popularity. I expect these to be far more niche than variable fonts but may see a lifeline in the icon font space.

Keep those fonts frosty, y’all.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

Re: ?: double-byte font editor for Mac

From: Richard S. Cook ([email protected])
Date: Sat Jul 19 1997 - 08:52:53 EDT

Hi all.
Re the results of my previous queries. It seems that there is a PowerPC
native double-byte TT font editor included in the Hong Kong/Taiwan
localized release of the Mac OS (7.6T). This application *will not* run on
68k machines.

I have as yet not been able to test it (on a PPC), nor do I know how it
will function with versions of the CLK other than v.1.3 (see below), and
so my next questions:

Can someone who *has* used it please give a description of what it can do?
Can it be used, by whatever workaround, to modify/create an entire font?
Does it allow the user to assign new chars. to empty codepoints, and if
so, how many (is there an upper limit to the number of Chinese chars.),
and how is wordprocessing input of such new chars. handled?

Can anyone recommend a US vendor selling the Hong Kong/Taiwan localized
release of the Mac OS (7.6T) CD Package?

>> "TrueType Font Editor" from:
>> Apple Asia Chinese Language Kits (AACLK) Version 1.3.
>> (A.k.a. Mac OS 7.6T CD Package. T=Traditional Chinese.
>> The Package can install both CLK only or the full Chinese System.)
>> This AACLK 1.3 was only available in Taiwan, HongKong.

_____________________________
Richard S. Cook, Jr.
Somerville, MA USA 02144
email: [email protected]
http://world.std.com/~rscook/
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>*<<<<<<<<<<<<<<



This archive was generated by hypermail 2.1.2 : Tue Jul 10 2001 - 17:20:36 EDT

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]

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[image: org.fontforge.FontForge.png] Hi, all. On Wednesday, November 7th, 2000, George W. Williams V first published a piece of software called PfaEdit that allowed rudimentary editing of PostScript fonts. It lacked the features and polish of such prominent products as Fontographer and Font Studio, but it had one big advantage: it was free. Twenty years later, Fontographer and FontStudio are gone, and the whereabouts of George Williams are unknown, but FontForge has grown into a highly capable and mature product. It supports dozens of file formats and includes such features as spline stroking, overlap removal, and Python scripting. And it is still free software. With over 100,000 users, it is the most widely used typeface design tool in the world. It may seem anti-climactic that today's 20th anniversary release includes no major changes or new features, but it perfectly befits a product that has evolved carefully and slowly over its entire lifecycle with almost no breaking changes. Whether for the special commemorative splash screen or for the countless small improvements and fixes, we hope that you will try it. It is available, as always, on the FontForge website <https://fontforge.org/>. The entire project team thank you for your support. Best wishes, Frank
[image: org.fontforge.FontForge.png] Hi, all. I am happy to announce the March 2020 release of FontForge. Changes include the following. - FontForge now has much improved stroke expansion functionality. The main change is that it actually works most of the time. New features include support for arbitrary convex nibs and the miter-clip and arc join styles from SVG 2. All functionality is accessible from the Python and native APIs. (By Skef Iterum.) - Remove overlap handles certain important edge cases better. (By Skef Iterum and Frank Trampe.) - The Python API now has a function called `genericGlyphChange` that matches the "Change Glyph" command in the GUI. See #4133 for more details. (By Skef Iterum.) - The Python API now has functions for getting Unicode script and for interrogating glyph boundaries. (By Fred Brennan.) - One can now use text flags (rather than just numerical flags) when opening a font file via the Python API. (By Skef Iterum.) - UFO import now outputs the note field properly. (By Skef Iterum.) - SVG import is much more robust. (By Skef Iterum.) - We have dropped most gnulib and autotools logic in favor of CMake, which dramatically simplifies the build system and just as dramatically improves build time. (By Jeremy Tan.) - As part of the switch to CMake, per the deprecation of Python 2, and per the lack of objections to the proposal on the mailing list, we have dropped support for building FontForge with Python 2 support. The non-build-system Python 2 code remains, but it is neither tested nor maintained nor supported and is likely to follow a trajectory of decay and then removal. - Documentation is now rendered in Sphinx, which makes maintenance and improvement easier. (By Jeremy Tan.) - Translations now happen on crowdin, which makes contributions easier. (By Jeremy Tan.) - We got such a contribution for Croatian. (By Milo Ivir.) - Character view point coloring is more consistent, and preview fills support transparency. (By Skef Iterum.) - The user can now move and close tabs in the character view. (By Fred Brennan.) - The metrics view now allows for entry of negative kerning values and runs a bit more smoothly. (By Fred Brennan.) - There is now a warning when a user is about to discard an unsaved script. (By Fred Brennan.) - We fixed bugs all over, as always, with particular attention given to the metrics view, Python, Spiro, and high-resolution displays. Go to the FontForge website <https://fontforge.org/> to get the right package for your system. Best wishes, Frank
Yes. The build process broke in the midst of other changes. They will be ready with the next release. Please try the AppImage if that works. On Mon, Apr 15, 2019 at 10:11 AM Mauro Sacchetto <[email protected]> wrote: > .deb packages are not yet ready? > thanx > > ms > > Il 13/04/19 12:45, T J ha scritto: > > Hi all, > > > > FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. > > > > This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Most > > notably, it resolves a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that > > contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has > > also been removed. > > > > The source tarball, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) and Windows binaries are all > > available from https://fontforge.github.io. > > > > Thanks, > > > > Jeremy > > > > > > > > _______________________________________________ > > Fontforge-announce mailing list > > [email protected] > > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce > > > > > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
I did not issue notes for the previous release since a new one was imminent anyway. I am attaching them here. - The user interface is now able to use GDK instead of X11, which means much smoother operation on Windows and Macintosh. - UFO 2 and UFO 3 are now handled as separate formats, which allows us to support more of the UFO 3 format. Some workflows may need adjustment as a result. See this bulletin <http://fontforge.github.io/en-US/bulletins/ufo3_2018_1/> for more information. - FontForge now tolerates a much wider range of syntax in feature files. - FontForge can now import and export WOFF2. - FontForge now supports Unicode 12.1.0. - The Python interface now allows finer interaction with splines. On Sun, Apr 14, 2019 at 3:43 AM T J <[email protected]> wrote: > Hi all, > > > > FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. > > > > This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Most > notably, it resolves a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that > contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has > also been removed. > > > > The source tarball, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) and Windows binaries are all > available from https://fontforge.github.io. > > > > Thanks, > > Jeremy > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
.deb packages are not yet ready? thanx ms Il 13/04/19 12:45, T J ha scritto: > Hi all, > > FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. > > This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Most > notably, it resolves a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that > contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has > also been removed. > > The source tarball, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) and Windows binaries are all > available from https://fontforge.github.io. > > Thanks, > > Jeremy > > > > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
Hi all, FontForge has been updated to the 2019-04-13 release. This is mostly a bugfix release on top of the 2019-03-17 release. Most notably, it resolves a crash on MacOS when browsing directories that contain empty files. Plugins support and direct http/ftp integration has also been removed. The source tarball, MacOS, Linux (AppImage) and Windows binaries are all available from https://fontforge.github.io. Thanks, Jeremy
Hello, my characters are already drawn with Illustrator, which is my favorite vector program. Unfortunately copy + paste from Illu to Fontforge doesn’t work (on my Mac). Is there any solution? Thanks in advance! Friendly Greetz Peter Hübner Homepage: http://PH-Layout.de E-Mail: [email protected]
Hi, Judith. The announcement list is only for release announcements, so incoming mail only goes to the list administrators rather than to the user community. If you want community support, I would suggest joining the users list <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-users>. I also don't understand your question, but I'll inquire further when you post there. Best wishes, Frank On Thu, Oct 20, 2016 at 11:19 PM, Dr. Judith Martha Prewitt < [email protected]> wrote: > Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook > on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in > LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? > > Judith Prewitt > > > ------------------------------------------------------------ > ------------------ > Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most > engaging tech sites, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
Hi Judith, Here's something similar: http://superuser.com/questions/490922/merging-two-fonts Mike On 21 October 2016 at 16:16, Mike Wallbridge <[email protected]> wrote: > Hi Judith, > > For some reason I don't understand, your question about merging fonts came > into my inbox. I'm not a techy so don't know exactly what you mean but I > may have done something similar of late in editing a font to use certain > symbols I wanted to bring in for the purpose of music annotations. It was a > case of feeling my way along but ended up being much easier than I thought. > Anyway I used a free Mac app called FontForge and it was very intuitive, > though you do need to install XQuartz first. If you open a ttf font into > Font Forge you get basically a map of the keys and the symbols within and > can edit them by using copy and paste. So by opening up two fonts you can > shift symbols around to get what you're after. Very straightforward. The > file you end up with doesn't have the ttf suffix (I can't remember what it > is) but you can easily go on-line and find a converter. Rename the "new" > font and put it in the font folder. It should work with both Pages and > LibreOffice. I hope this helps. > > Cheers > Mike > > On 21 October 2016 at 05:19, Dr. Judith Martha Prewitt < > [email protected]> wrote: > >> Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook >> on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in >> LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? >> >> Judith Prewitt >> >> >> ------------------------------------------------------------ >> ------------------ >> Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most >> engaging tech sites, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot >> _______________________________________________ >> Fontforge-announce mailing list >> [email protected] >> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >> > >
Hi Judith, For some reason I don't understand, your question about merging fonts came into my inbox. I'm not a techy so don't know exactly what you mean but I may have done something similar of late in editing a font to use certain symbols I wanted to bring in for the purpose of music annotations. It was a case of feeling my way along but ended up being much easier than I thought. Anyway I used a free Mac app called FontForge and it was very intuitive, though you do need to install XQuartz first. If you open a ttf font into Font Forge you get basically a map of the keys and the symbols within and can edit them by using copy and paste. So by opening up two fonts you can shift symbols around to get what you're after. Very straightforward. The file you end up with doesn't have the ttf suffix (I can't remember what it is) but you can easily go on-line and find a converter. Rename the "new" font and put it in the font folder. It should work with both Pages and LibreOffice. I hope this helps. Cheers Mike On 21 October 2016 at 05:19, Dr. Judith Martha Prewitt < [email protected]> wrote: > Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook > on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in > LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? > > Judith Prewitt > > > ------------------------------------------------------------ > ------------------ > Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most > engaging tech sites, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce >
Is it possible to merge the following two sets of fonts: one in FontBook on Mac Mini running under Sierra, available for Pages, and one in LibreOffice on same machine running under same operating system? Judith Prewitt
Can the new version be compiled to run on earlier versions of Mac OSX than 10.10? On Tue, Oct 4, 2016 at 7:09 AM, Frank Trampe <[email protected]> wrote: > [image: Inline image 1] > Hi, folks. > > I'm happy to announce the October release of FontForge, a little late > perhaps, but worth the wait. It brings a number of changes. > > - The modern-looking theme featured on the website, created by Andreas > Larsen, now ships by default with FontForge. All old themes continue to > work. > - Handling of CID ranges, certain bitmap typeface formats, and spline > stroking is better and more consistent. > - FontForge now supports Unicode 9.0. > - We (and I mean mostly Jeremy Tan) fixed a number of user interface > quirks. > - And we fixed some crashes. > > > Go to the FontForge website <http://fontforge.github.io/en-US/> to get > the right package for your platform. > > Best wishes, > > Frank > > > ------------------------------------------------------------ > ------------------ > Check out the vibrant tech community on one of the world's most > engaging tech sites, SlashDot.org! http://sdm.link/slashdot > _______________________________________________ > Fontforge-announce mailing list > [email protected] > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/fontforge-announce > > -- -- Jason Pagura zimbach at gmail dot com
[image: Inline image 1] Hi, folks. I'm happy to announce the October release of FontForge, a little late perhaps, but worth the wait. It brings a number of changes. - The modern-looking theme featured on the website, created by Andreas Larsen, now ships by default with FontForge. All old themes continue to work. - Handling of CID ranges, certain bitmap typeface formats, and spline stroking is better and more consistent. - FontForge now supports Unicode 9.0. - We (and I mean mostly Jeremy Tan) fixed a number of user interface quirks. - And we fixed some crashes. Go to the FontForge website <http://fontforge.github.io/en-US/> to get the right package for your platform. Best wishes, Frank
----- Khaled Hosny <[email protected]> wrote: > On Mon, Feb 21, 2011 at 07:25:31PM -0800, George Williams wrote: > > I've packaged up a new release of fontforge. > > Great! Not so great. I left out two patches. There's a new, new release now please use it instead.
I've packaged up a new release of fontforge.
I fear I no longer have time to provide (and support) binary releases, so the current release is source (and documentation) only.
I have, I hope, posted a new release of fontforge. Sourceforge has changed it's release upload mechanism. It no longer seems possible to have sourceforge send out automatic emails announcing this fact. More troubling, sourceforge claims there is a 15 minute delay between my posting files and them being available for release. It has been several hours, and at the moment only three of the files I posted are displayed. Perhaps it takes longer than 15 minutes. Perhaps something more is broken.
[email protected] skribis: > The first time you run fontforge with Pango something takes several > minutes to initialize itself. This delay does not occur on > subsequent invocations. Building a font cache, perhaps, especially if it isn't depending on fontconfig for all the font info and so has to open all the fonts for itself. One has to wait similarly while LuaTeX uses fontforge code to build a font cache. :)
First release with Pango and Cairo. The first time you run fontforge with Pango something takes several minutes to initialize itself. This delay does not occur on subsequent invocations. The version of Cairo available from fink on the mac is so old that FontForge can't use it. The default fontconfig setup on the mac does not seem to find any outline fonts (reverting to bitmaps). Create a ~/.fonts directory yourself, and put some fonts there. Pango crashes on my cygwin system, so the cygwin build does not contain either Pango or Cairo.
Support for Adobe's proposed cmap format=14 subtable (variation selectors) Support for making fontforge a python extension.
31-August-2007 * New traditional Chinese translation of the UI by Wei-Lun Chao. * Updated Vietnamese translation by Clytie Siddall. * Removed the old MetaFont command (which didn't work) and replaced it with a styles menu (incorporating the old Effects menu, and a command to change weight, to condense/extend, and to oblique. Added python scripting commands {font,glyph}.{changeWeight,condenseExtend} * Lots of new work on the truetype autoinstructor by Alexej and Michal. * Add a validation dialog which can be run just before generating a font. * Try a different algorithm for approximating splines by line segments (for drawing them in the outline glyph view and elsewhere). This one should show symmetry better. * Provide the ability to ask freetype to rasterize glyphs without hints in the Print/Display dlg (even if the glyphs have hints, rasterize them without). * Oh dear, rasterizing stroked fonts only worked if multilayer was defined. * Try to improve display of stroked fonts. * When stroking splines don't let miter joins grow excessively. * FF would remove instructions from glyphs that had at least two contours the first of which started with a control point. * Add a short cut for Hide Grid in the metrics view. * Python 2.5 initializes itself differently from Python 2.[34]. 2.[34] delay the init until an import happens, while 2.5 does it at start up. I just assumed that when I called Py_Initialize that it did so. This led to a crash on 2.[34] when I tried to use my types before the user had tried to import fontforge. * Further improvements to tile path. * When moving a control point in a ttf font where one side of the cp was a real point, I would allow an implicit point on the far side of the real point to become real. * When dragging truetype points around, adjacent implicit points would remain where they were (and not be implicit any longer). * FF would randomly crash after removing a lot of glyphs. * The knife tool would not cut a contour if it landed on a point. * Trying to add a stylename to the size pane of fontinfo generally caused a crash. * All blank lines in the display dlg had the same line spacing as that of the first character displayed in the dlg. * I don't think feature files where handling classes defined with '-' properly. * Read the "lib" structures from UFO/GLIF files into our python persistant data. (And write our persistant data out if it's a dict). * Add the ability to call hooks (python functions) when various fontforge events take place. * Make fontforge's basic types (Point, Contour, and Layer) be picklable so they can now be saved in an sfd file. * Oops. With the inclusion of the library check argument, ff would not compile if NODYNAMIC were set. * FontForge now stores the "userdata" python members into the sfd file as pickled objects. (FontForge's own types are not currently pickleable). * Add the ability to mark a glyph so that just before being saved its references will be unlinked and we will run remove overlap on it. This means the user can work with the references (and get the automatic updating they confer) and still not have a self-intersecting glyph in the output (think Aring, Ccedilla, Eogonek). * Create a fontlint script file. * When dumping both apple and opentype bitmap tables if there were a BDF table, then we'd get garbage for 'bloc'/'bhed'. * Add some user interface commands to python, and more importantly, add the ability to create menu items which will invoke python scripts, and the ability to add import/export conversion filters (again, python scripts). * Counter hints for LCG glyphs came out wrong if autohint had not been applied first. * Counter masks were not read out of sfd files properly. * Selecting a counter mask in Glyph Info caused FF to crash. * The Execute Script dlg would sometimes complain about invalid scrollbar size when it got closed. * AddAnchorPoint (scripting command) should be prepared to cast real args to integers. * Just as I needed a special "in use" pass of GSUB when reading from a TTC, so I also need an "in use" pass of the MATH table. * All this time and I've mapped "nonmarkingreturn" (GID=2) to Unicode+000C instead of Unicode+000D. I'm a twit.
23-July-2007 * I have merged (and substantially rewritten) the Print and Display Dialogs. There is now only one menu item (Print) which (vaguely) the old Display dlg except that it can now be printed. The text area widget now supports OpenType features just as the metrics view does. It also supports ligature carets. The dialog is no longer modal, however it does not get updated with each change to the font (that would make moving a point around in the outline view far too sluggish), instead there is a [Refresh] button the user can press to force an update. * It occurred to me that fontforge's current mechanism for setting ligature carets requires that there be a ligature substitution is the exact number of components used to make the glyph. But in indic fonts ligatures are often made up out of other ligatures (I think) which means that there won't be enough caret positions. So I've added a Ligature Caret count to the Element->Glyph Info dialog to give the user control over it when necessary. * Add minimal support for applying apple state machine lookups in metrics view. Support is minimal because: * Apple seems to figure line breaks before doing substitution process but I do it afterward so I don't know where the line breaks are and I can't enter either the line start or line end state. * When I delete a glyph I delete it. Apple inserts a deleted glyph mark and then removes that later. State machines can respond to deleted glyphs, but I can't. * I don't try to figure out which feature,settings should be on by default. So the user must pick them out manually. * Add popup graphics to the Glyph Info and Lookup subtable dialogs to show substitutions (that is if there is an entry like 'smcp' a => a.sc then create a popup window showing the "a" glyph and the "a.sc" so the user can see what happens. * Another futile attempt at an embolden command. Element->Embolden * Add shortcuts to the anchor control dlg (Page Up/Page Down) to move to the next/previous glyph. * Michal Nowakowski has improved the truetype autoinstructor. He warns that it probably still has bugs (as what does not?) so I am leaving the old code available for now. He says it works best in "a clean (uninstructed) font with well defined blue zones and stems". * If we have a glyph with multiple encodings, and the secondary encodings occur after the primary ones, then the backmap will probably contain a secondary encoding, which means that when we go to load the font in we will probably notice the secondary encoding twice and forget the primary. * I used not to distinguish between ligature anchors and normal mark to base anchors. Unfortunately when I moved to lookups (from features) I had to introduce that distinction. But I didn't work through all the implications and have fixed a number of bugs related to that. * Barry SCHWARTZ complains that font info says "fontnames must" but that the cited adobe tech note only says "should". So change "must" to "should". * When processing class-based contextual lookups fontforge could not handle class 0 (the class containing "all glyphs not in another class") add code to do that. * If the user did not select a Gasp Version (note: active selection was needed, just seeing that it was correct and leaving it didn't work) then [OK] would leave the font with an invalid version and on some systems caused a crash. * View->Insert Glyph After didn't work well on a ligature glyph. It would insert the glyph after the first component of the ligature, not after the last -- which would make more sense. * Misnamed some private dict entries when loading from otf. * Make entry of ghost hints better. * Add the ability to determine whether a point is selected or not from python. * Add a mechanism so the user can ask fontforge to check for the existance of optional libraries. * Add range checks to some library routines which blindly referenced some BMP arrays with codepoints outside bmp. Broken by UCS2->UCS4 change. * Werner wants GotoChar to be able to switch sub-fonts in a cid keyed font. This may introduce bugs... * Revert glyph still wasn't working. * Someone complained that using a negative stroke took a very long time but produced correct results. Um. Ok. It's easy always to use the absolute value. * Oops. The mac uses UCS2 for filenames, so when I moved to UCS4 I should have changed the mac resource file interface. * When creating a mac resource file we only set the type/creator fields and failed to initialize the finderFlags. * Fixed crash bug in generating a cursive connection anchor sub-table. * In TrueType composite glyphs with the USE_MY_METRICS bit set the lock icon wasn't scrolled properly. * The change from UCS2 to UCS4 broke text copy/paste. We failed to add a terminating NUL of the right size in all cases We continued to use charset=UCS-2 when it should have been UCS-4 * FF crashed when trying to View->Show ATT on a font that appears to me to contain an invalid 'kern' sub-table. I have removed the proximate cause of the crash. I have provided a warning that the kern table appears invalid. And I have cleaned up my internals after detecting the bad sub-table (I had a lookup with a feature but no script and this caused problems). * Multiple substitutions in the metrics view did not properly update the count of glyphs to be displayed. * If nothing changed in the metrics input field and the output contained a ligature (or a mult subs I suspect). FF would complain. * in python, font.generate() didn't work. The PyArg_ParseTupleAndKeywords behaves in a way I did not expect. * [Bottom] and [Down] still didn't work for lookup subtables. * Try to force the text field in the metricsview to a fixed size. In some fonts it seems to be initialized to a huge value. * Add ability to display italic side bearings in the char view. * The lines drawn for italic fonts to show the italic origin and width were at slightly the wrong angle (I used a sine when I should have used a tangent). * If a font did not have any horizontal metrics then ff would not set the em-size. * Show Att trampled on memory when displaying apple contextual substitution state machines. * Wasn't parsing apple's 'lcar' table properly. * if a font contained a 'post' table but didn't name all names (or something like that), then the attempt to name the glyph based on the encoding was broken after the encoding change. * FF did not recognize that a bdf file was greymaped. Broken by the bdf properties work a year ago or so. * The import lookups button in fontinfo forgot about the subtables (sort of). * The metricsview used the wrong count field to determine whether things changed. It used the glyph count, not the char count (which meant that when we had a ligature and the number of chars was greater than the number of glyphs, things got confused.) * In the metrics view, anchored attachments only worked if the base glyph were itself unmoved (that is the mark was placed relative to the unmoved location, not the actual location). * The search dialog should provide user with control over the error bound. The rotate checkbox didn't work if the flip checkbox wasn't checked. * If a replace contour added a control point to a point that did not have one (went from a line to a curve) then that control point would get lost. If a search matched across the start point of a contour then search/replace could go into an infinite loop if the search and replace paths were the same. * Find/Replace (replace) didn't work on quadratic splines. * Add two python methods: * Layer.interpolateNewLayer(other-layer,amount) * Font.createInterpolatedGlyph(glyph1,glyph2,amount) The first creates a new layer by interpolating between the current layer and the layer in the first argument. The second creates a new glyph in the font by interpolating between the first two arguments. The glyph's unicodecode point and name will be copied from the first argument (the font must not already contain this glyph). If amount is 0 the result will look like the first glyph, if 1 then like the second. * When recovering from a crash, FF would sometimes complain about a mismatched version number. Don't. * Problems parsing 'mort' tables could cause a crash. * When building a contextual lookup, don't list that lookup as something that it could invoke (ie. list all lookups in this table (GPOS/GSUB) except for ourselves). Don't want to encourage users to create infinite lookup loops. * Point matching didn't work when there were references to references and multiple references within a glyph. * FF was having problems with extension lookups with multiple sub tables. * We were trying to print a trailing NUL in some strings from the fontview. * Kerning by classes got broken in metricsview by the addition of support for device tables. * A GPOS contextual lookup only listed GSUB lookups in the lookup/sequence dlg Pressing [OK] in the lookup/sequence dlg caused a crash if no lookup selected. * Openfontdlg was looking at the filter listbutton rather than the rename namelist listbutton. * mf2pt1 now uses "glyph_dimensions" rather than "bbox" * The metrics view should now handle device tables. * Goto could crash when used on small encodings. * -lang wasn't permitted before -c. * Use numeric text fields for anchor positioning. * Graham Asher points out that the meanings of underline position in the 'post' table and the FontInfo dictionary are different. One refers to the top of the underline rectangle and one to the center of it. * Align point would crash if the selected point were the end point of a contour (or if the two points around it were in the same place). * The baseline was not properly located when displaying it in the fontview. * The scripting command BitmapsAvail would generally cause FF to crash if done when there was a UI.. * We seem to be misimplementing my obsolete (sfd file) convention for having duplicate encodings point to the same glyph. Result was that occasionally a glyph would be removed and a pointer to something it refered to would be put in its place. * Change the name of activeFontInUI to activeFont Add an activeGlyph method. Add the ability to call a python script from a outline view. * Hmmm. If a textfield is shifted right, and then resized so there's now room for all the text, the unshift it. * Werner suggests that it would be useful to be able to specify wildcards in the goto dlg. * Michael Zedler tells me that glyphs output by mf2pt1 contain a line: % MF2PT1: bbox 0 90 834 422 where the third (so called) bounding box entry is actually the glyph's advance width. I was reluctant to use this at first, because that clearly isn't something that belongs in a bounding box... * Werner tells me that lilypond uses a slightly different syntax for the MF2PT1 bbox comment, so make our parsing slightly more generous. * When creating a new lookup subtable for an anchored lookup, it did not get marked as having anchor classes and feature file output failed because of that. * When outputing single lookups, the feature, script and language tags all had ^A where they should have had the second letter of the tag. * Remove the code to produce the old, broken, 'size' feature.
I have posted a new release of fontforge. This release represents a major change for fontforge. 1) OpenType features and lookups are handled quite differently now (and non-OpenType stuff has been forced into that mold so it's different too). The changelog goes through the major differences http://fontforge.sf.net/changelog.html 2) FontForge now supports python scripting. The (fontforge) python modules are described at http://fontforge.sf.net/python.html this is not well tested, because I'm not very familiar with python. Not all of the executables have been build with python (because I didn't know what the "standard" python version might be for that system or because I did not want to force people to download python in order to use fontforge. I would like to thank Apostolos Syropoulos, Lee Chenhwa, Michal Nowakowski, Philipp Poll, and Pierre Hanser for providing translations.
On Wed, 2007-03-14 at 19:01, George Williams wrote: > On Tue, 2007-03-13 at 07:40, George Williams wrote: > > Sometime later this week I hope to post an experimental build containing > > a major rewrite of the UI. > I had hoped that I would have time to finish rewriting the The metrics view has changed considerably. It displays all the features in the font, and allows you to select which ones you want active in the view. It lets you set the script & language. It will apply lookups that it couldn't handle previously like ligatures and contextuals. It does not do Indic glyph reordering. I'm not sure how to and last I checked MS had not updated their docs to reflect their new procedures.
On Tue, 2007-03-13 at 07:40, George Williams wrote: > Sometime later this week I hope to post an experimental build containing > a major rewrite of the UI. I had hoped that I would have time to finish rewriting the documentation, but it appears that is not to be. (I go on vacation tomorrow to run a marathon). Instead I shall post an experimental source tarball into the file release system (in the 12-March release), update the cvs tree, and write a few words here about the differences. The major change is that fontforge now presents lookups to the user rather than features. I think this makes simple things more difficult (which is why I avoided this when I started), but it makes complex things possible. Sadly the world is not simple. So when a piece of typographic information is created (a ligature, a kern pair, a glyph substitution, etc.) it must be tagged with a lookup (actually a lookup sub-table) rather than a feature tag. The lookup itself will be tagged with a feature tag (possibly several tags) and with scripts and languages in which that lookup should be active. NOTE: This reverses the way GPOS/GSUB think about things, but it contains the same information. The Font Info dialog now contains a Lookup pane which allows you to create and edit lookups and their subtables. You can also reorder them. The order shown in the dialog is the order in which they will be applied. A mac feature/setting subtable also gets converted into this format. The Font Info dialog no longer has Anchor Classes, Contextual, or State Machine panes. Instead you can edit a lookup subtable's data. There are new dialogs which list all the information for each lookup type (ie. a dialog which lists all kern pairs in a subtable), and these provide access to the old anchor class, contextual or state machine dialogs. The Glyph Info command has also changed. It looks simpler and more comprehensible (I think), but the act of creating a new substitution has become more complex because (potentially) one must create a new lookup and lookup subtable before doing the simple task of adding a new replacement glyph. The kerning class, contextual and state machine dialogs have all changed in that they no longer request a feature tag, they now need a lookup subtable. The metrics view also needs a subtable. And so do many other dialogs. Show ATT has changed, but it is still not editable. I hope that the Lookups pane will do that instead. There used to be a scripting command which indicated what ligature features got stored in afm files. Now each ligature lookup has a flag set on it which conveys this information. The Element->Typographic Features menu has been removed. It's functionality has moved into Font Info->Lookups (I hope I've got everything). Some scripting commands have been removed, others have been changed and others have been added. I apologize for this, as it will break existing scripts, but some basic concepts no longer exist and others, very different, have replaced them. Removed: DefaultATT ControlAfmLigatureOutput ApplySubstitutions CopyGlyphFeatures AddATT Replaced with AddPosSub RemoveATT GlyphInfo(Position/Pair/Substitution/AltSubs/MultSubs/Ligature) SelectByATT Replaced with SelectByPosSub Changed Set(V)Kern takes an optional third argument, a lookup subtable name (if not specified it choses one) AddAnchorClass(name,type,lookup-subtable-name) GetPosSub(subtable-name) AutoKern(spacing,threshold,subtable-name[,kernfile]) Added AddLookup(name,type,flags,feature-script-lang-array[,after-lookup-name]) n*[feature-tag,script-lang-array] n*[script-tag,lang-array] n*[lang] GetLookupInfo(lookup-name) => [type,flags,feature-script-lang-array] AddLookupSubtable(lookup-name,subtable-name[,after-subtable-name]) GetLookupOfSubtable(subtable-name) GetSubtableOfAnchorClass(anchor-class-name) AddPosSub(subtable-name,variant(s)) (subtable-name,dx,dy,dadv_x,dadv_y) (subtable-name,other-glyph-name,dx,dy...) RemoveLookupSubtable(subtable-name) RemoveLookup(lookup-name) MergeLookupSubtables(subtable-name1,subtable-name2) MergeLookups(lookup-name1,lookup-name2) SelectByPosSub(subtable-name,search_type) GetLookups("GPOS"/"GSUB") GetLookupSubtables(lookup-name) LookupStoreLigatureInAfm(lookup-name,store-it) LookupSetFeatureList(lookup-name,feature-script-lang-array) The sfd format has changed. New files are tagged as version 2. Old files will still work, but ff will no longer produce file in the old format. I'm not aware of any bugs... :-)

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